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Reports: Novartis exits vaccines and animal health while acquiring oncology business from GSK

BY Michael Johnsen

ZURICH — Novartis on Tuesday made a number of moves that have fundamentally reshaped its business, according to published reports. Novartis exchanged its vaccine business with GlaxoSmithKline in a deal valued at $7.1 billion for GSK’s oncology portfolio (at a cost of $14.5 billion) and divested its animal health unit to Ely Lilly for approximately $5.4 billion. 

As part of its deal with GSK, Novartis and GSK have created a joint venture with GSK in consumer healthcare. GSK will take the lead in running a future consumer health business worth about $10 billion in annual revenue with Novartis, Reuters reported. Meanwhile, Eli Lilly will have the No. 2 animal health business by revenue worldwide. 

The moves make Novartis a significant supplier of high-margin cancer medicines (No. 2 behind Roche), while GSK becomes a vaccine powerhouse.  

"The global pharmaceuticals sector has seen a flurry of deal-making recently as large companies seek to focus on a small number of leading businesses, while smaller specialty and generic producers seek greater scale," Reuters reported. 

Novartis reported it would start a separate sale process for its flu business, which was not part of the deal with GSK.

 

 

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McKesson to raise awareness around Earth Day with fourth annual Green Week

BY Michael Johnsen

SAN FRANCISCO — McKesson Corp. on Tuesday announced that in observance of Earth Day, the company will celebrate its fourth annual Green Week April 21-25. McKesson’s Green Week will focus on raising awareness and inspiring action. While informing employees about McKesson’s efforts to reduce its environmental footprint, the campaign will also provide ways that employees can make a difference. Each day of McKesson’s Green Week 2014 is organized around a theme, such as Meat Free Monday or Fossil Free Friday.

“McKesson aims to create better health for our customers, our employees, our communities and our planet," stated Carrie Varoquiers, VP corporate citizenship. "Engaging our employees in environmental efforts only strengthens our commitment to maintaining a healthy, vibrant and sustainable company.”

McKesson will also encourage participation in an online pledge prompting all its employees to think about how they might change their habits and celebrate Earth Day every day. McKesson will be donating one tree to the National Forest Foundation for each employee who submits their pledge.

McKesson’s employee-led Environmental Councils drive awareness of local environmental initiatives and help scale enterprise-wide sustainability programs. The Councils represent a variety of locations, from offices of 2,000 employees to distribution centers to call centers. Environmental Councils host events, speakers, vendor fairs and volunteer activities.

McKesson’s business practices promoting better health include:

  • Fleet Efficiency: Since 2010, McKesson has focused on reducing fleet emissions by replacing unleaded gasoline and diesel engines with more fuel-efficient compressed natural gas engines in its U.S. Pharma sales fleet. Between fiscal years 2012 and 2013 alone, fleet CO2 emissions (in pounds) decreased 24%, and average CO2 emissions per vehicle decreased 30%;
  • Building Efficiency: McKesson uses the Environmental Protection Agency’s Energy Star Portfolio Manager to benchmark its facilities. In its U.S. portfolio, 25 facilities qualify as Energy Star, totaling 2.4 million square feet; and
  • Supply Chain Efficiency: To analyze McKesson's distribution operations, the company developed the Supply Chain Sustainability Model in partnership with IBM Research. SCSM collects energy use and carbon emissions from fleet vehicles and every piece of equipment in the distribution center. It allows McKesson the agility to adjust operations, which drives decreased carbon emissions and reduced fuel consumption.

 

 

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PTCB makes patient safety CE required for pharmacy technician recertification

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON — The Pharmacy Technician Certification Board on Monday announced that Certified Pharmacy Technicians eligible to recertify are now required to complete one hour of continuing education in patient safety, in addition to the already required hour of law CE, as part of 20 hours of CE needed for recertification. The new requirement is one of the planned Certification Program changes PTCB announced early last year to advance CPhT qualifications. 

"Certified pharmacy technicians are essential members of the pharmacy practice team," stated Everett McAllister, PTCB executive director and CEO. "By continually learning more about how to prevent harm, CPhTs can have a positive impact on advancing the patient safety culture within pharmacies and the entire continuum of care."

PTCB has adopted the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education definition of patient safety described in the ACPE Policy and Procedures Manual. While PTCB-acceptable patient safety CE courses must be based on ACPE’s patient safety definition, PTCB will not require CE credits to be earned only from ACPE-accredited providers. All CPhTs applying to renew certification must fulfill the new patient safety CE requirement. 

As many as 89% of respondents to a profession-wide online survey conducted by PTCB in March 2012 supported adding a medication safety (equivalent to patient safety) CE requirement for recertification. "Pharmacy technicians assist pharmacists with duties that greatly affect patient care and safety, so it is important for CPhTs to be educated on how their daily responsibilities shape the medication distribution system," commented Scott Meyers, chair of the PTCB Board of Governors. "Adding the required hour in patient safety will help ensure CPhTs are prepared to safely assist with the practice of pharmacy."

Other planned Certification Program changes include American Society of Health-System Pharmacists-accredited education requirements for certification by 2020, and additional changes in acceptable CE programs for recertification, including requiring all 20 CE hours to be pharmacy technician-specific in 2015. Allowable CE hours from college courses will be reduced from 15 to 10 by 2016, and allowable in-service CE hours will be phased out by 2018. 

PTCB’s program changes elevate PTCB’s certification standards and thereby support and advance improved patient care and safety throughout pharmacy practice. The changes are the result of a PTCB initiative which began with a 2011 summit on future directions for pharmacy technicians. Summit findings, combined with results from two profession-wide surveys, called for decisive changes in certification standards.

 

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t.juarez says:
Jan-12-2016 11:44 am

Always need more education I will always continue to learn more

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