HEALTH

Reports: Drug industry organizations sue Seattle-area county government over drug-disposal ordinance

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK — Four drug industry trade groups are suing the board of health in King County, Wash., over a local health ordinance that they say shifts the burden of sustainable disposal of unwanted drugs onto drug companies, according to published reports.

The Seattle Times reported that the groups sued the board of health of King County, where Seattle is, in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington, alleging that a requirement that they provide safe-disposal containers to pharmacies and police stations violates the commerce clause of the Constitution. According to reports, the groups include the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, the Generic Pharmaceutical Association, the Consumer Healthcare Products Association and the Biotechnology Industry Organization.

The program is one of several set up around the country as part of an effort to keep unused and expired drugs out of landfills and sewage systems, where, research has shown, they can contaminate soil and drinking water.

The King County policy was modeled on a similar one in Alameda County, Calif., that a federal court upheld, according to The Seattle Times.

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

J.KESSLER says:
Dec-09-2013 12:22 pm

Pharma cannot effectively comply nor absorb multitude regulations that are set up on a county-by-county basis. This is a very incorrect approach to tackling the ultimate end goal. The DEA has already established annual / bi-annual national take-back programs, which Pharma ultimately pays for through various federal and state fees. A more sane approach would be to involve community hospitals, non-acute care clinics, physician offices, and retail pharmacies as sites for take-back programs. The destruction services should be provided by the municipalities or counties and the expenses associated with this could be added to propertay tax or water bills, similar to how recyling is managed today. The end-user patient must take some responsibility in this matter, as we know that lack of patient prescription compliance is the biggest contributor to excess medication in home medicine cabinets. If these county-by-county regulations are allowed to become law, the patient will end up absorbing the costs associated with this one way or the other. Why not do it right and help to improve overall compliance, mitigate additional healthcare costs, and allow the actual health-care providers to become actively involved in the solution.

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

ZeaVision expands distribution of its EyePromise supplement line

BY Michael Johnsen

CHESTERFIELD, Mo. — ZeaVision on Wednesday announced that its EyePromise natural supplements are now available for broader distribution through vitamin, health retail and e-tail channels.

EyePromise products contain the highest levels of natural zeaxanthin of any eye health supplement, according to ZeaVision. The newest formula, EyePromise vizual EDGE, is based on the success of EyePromise vizual EDGE PRO, popular among professional athletes because it enhances their ability to see objects better and, therefore, react faster.

"With more than 40 million doses consumed, thousands of consumers and professional athletes have already experienced the benefits, so this is the next natural step in our evolution,” stated Dennis Gierhart, ZeaVision founder. “We’ve developed a line of nutraceuticals with the optimal combination of natural ingredients to deliver on our mission to improve and preserve healthy vision.”

ZeaVison cited research that demonstrated that consuming the optimal amount of zeaxanthin (found naturally in the center of the eye) builds the density of macular pigment. Zeaxanthin is scarce in most diets and only supplementation can deliver enough to build the macula, ZeaVision suggested. A daily dosage of zeaxanthin enhances vision in a variety of ways related to color saturation, contrast, glare and light sensitivity that can improve eye function.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

C&D to expand manufacturing capacity of gummy vitamins by 75%

BY Michael Johnsen

EWING, N.J. — Church & Dwight on Thursday announced plans to expand its gummy vitamin production capacity through the addition of a new production line to be constructed at its manufacturing facility in Pennsylvania. The company will continue to manufacture gummy vitamins at its two facilities in Washington. 

Construction will begin in January 2014 and the line is scheduled to be operational in the first quarter of 2015.

“The gummy vitamin business is strategically important to Church & Dwight and is expected to be a significant contributor to the future growth of sales, earnings and cash flows,” James Craigie, chairman and CEO said. “Our gummy vitamin sales are growing at a 20% rate to approximately $300 million in annual net sales in 2013. We expect double-digit gummy vitamin sales growth in 2014," he said. "We believe the future prospects of the gummy vitamin category are strong as more adults switch from traditional vitamin pills to gummy vitamins. This investment will expand our production capacity by 75% and will help to drive our long-term goals for revenue and earnings growth.”

Church & Dwight expects to invest approximately $55 million in capital expenditures to construct the new production line, which is expected to employ approximately 180 people. As announced today by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the company has received an economic development assistance package from the Commonwealth in connection with the investment, consisting of grants, tax credits and training funds.

 

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?