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Report: Target to pay $10 million in data breach class action

BY Marianne Wilson

NEW YORK — Target Corp. has agreed to pay $10 million in a proposed settlement of a class-action suit related to the company’s 2013 data breach, according to court documents filed Wednesday. The retailer confirmed the news in a CBS News report.

“We are pleased to see the process moving forward and look forward to its resolution," Target spokesperson Molly Snyder told CBS News late Wednesday.
   
The proposed settlement, which still must be approved by a federal district court judge, creates a settlement account that could pay individual victims up to $10,000 in damages, according to court documents. It would also require the retailer to appoint a chief information security officer, keep a written information security program and offer security training to its workers.

In addition, Target would be required to have a process to monitor for data security events.

A court hearing on proposal is scheduled for Thursday in St. Paul, Minnesota.

 

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Report: Expansion of retail-based health clinics to continue through 2019

BY Antoinette Alexander

 

NEW YORK — Given today’s healthcare landscape, which is riddled with shortcomings, consumers are increasingly turning to retail-based health clinics to fill gaps in care for acute ailments. In fact, total U.S. retail clinic sales are estimated at more than $1 billion for 2014 and sales are expected to continue expanding through 2019, according to Kalorama Information, a division of MarketResearch.com.

Kalorma’s “Retail Clinics 2015” report looks at retail clinics' impact and growth of market over the next five years.

"Strong historic growth has been driven by aggressive expansion, particularly by MinuteClinic, which is now owned by CVS," stated Bruce Carlson, publisher of Kalorama Information. "Growth is expected to continue."

Kalorama's report suggests that because of their location in stores, retail clinics serve a dual purpose of acting as businesses on their own and also bringing traffic to the store, as a customer seeking a healthcare service often makes purchases before or after their visit.

"The advantage of these clinics is that not only are they earning revenue for the companies that own them, but they also can bring customers to the store where they are expected to make more purchases," Carlson stated.  "Our report provides estimates of these indirect sales numbers."

Retail clinics by nature are designed to occupy small spaces and provide just basic care. Therefore, they do not use most of the sophisticated medical equipment found in hospitals or specialty centers such as advanced imaging devices. However, retail clinics are becoming relatively large users of point-of-care tests, clinical chemistry and immunoassay laboratory tests and vaccines. 

While drug stores will continue to represent the majority of all retail clinic locations by 2019, a rising number of clinics will be located at other facilities as the retail health care concept is embraced by a growing number of stores, according to the report.
 

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Walgreens Balance Rewards featured on new Atari fitness app

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK — Atari, one of the world's most recognized publishers and producers of interactive entertainment, on Thursday announced the launch of Atari Fit for iPhone, iPad, iPod touch and Android devices. Unlike other exercise apps, Atari Fit motivates consumers to reach their health goals with a gamified mobile experience that combines the best of the gaming and fitness industry.    
 
“With Atari Fit, players from around the globe can exercise, play and get healthy together by providing a gamified fitness experience unlike any other app currently available,” stated Fred Chesnais, Atari CEO. “By uniting the universal need to exercise and live healthfully with the entertaining experience unique to Atari games, we’ve created an app that proves fitness can be fun.”
 
Available on the App Store and Google Play, Atari Fit incentivizes users to get fit, stronger and healthier, while earning points to unlock fan-favorite Atari games, including Pong, Super Breakout and Centipede.
 
Atari is also working with Walgreens to bring real-world rewards through the Walgreens Balance Rewards for healthy choices program. By engaging with Atari Fit, gamers and non-gamers alike can earn Balance Rewards loyalty program points, which are redeemable at Walgreens locations nationwide or at Walgreens.com.
 
According to research from NPD Group, more than 25% of U.S. consumers use smartphone fitness apps. Furthermore, some of the most avid fitness app consumers (62%) include middle-aged women, who use their fitness apps three times more than the average customer — an audience of significant overlap with casual gaming. 
 
Atari Fit was developed in collaboration with fitness expert Michael Porter, a National Academy of Sports Medicine-certified personal trainer and performance enhancement specialist. Featuring over 100 exercises, more than 30 workout plans and customizable programs, including full-body circuit workouts, running programs and conditioning routines, Atari Fit is designed to challenge users at every level — from those just beginning their fitness journeys to the most active exercise enthusiasts.  
 
“Atari Fit provides a great balance of fitness and fun,” said Porter. “The certified programs are safe, effective, and give users access to really comprehensive fitness routines, while additional features like the tracking capabilities, daily tips, Atari games and multiple social components encourage users to engage with fitness in their every-day life.”
 
Atari Fit is compatible with the industry’s most popular wearable health and fitness devices, including Fitbit, Jawbone and Android Wear devices. It can also aggregate data from other fitness apps, such as RunKeeper, Apple Health and Google Fit, allowing users to aggregate all of their fitness activity in one location, while tapping into the set of tracking capabilities to capture the user’s distance, speed, pace, time and calories burned within the comprehensive log-book. 
 
Featuring multiple social components, Atari Fit users can exercise individually or in collaboration with friends in multiplayer mode. Players can join a team, workout or race against each other, and track activity statistics for group encouragement. At the end of workouts, users can post updates on Twitter and Facebook to share achievements and personal fitness bests with friends. The unlockable Atari games also grants users access to worldwide leaderboards, where they can rank their Pong, Super Breakout and Centipede skills against other players.
 
Development partners for Atari Fit include 8BitFit, a company focused on the gamification of fitness, and Gametheory, an award-winning production studio. 
 
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