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Report: Primary care physicians decreasing, giving way to retail clinic use

BY DSN STAFF

NEW YORK It seems as though each week more evidence surfaces suggesting that retail-based clinics will be a solution to the country’s healthcare crisis, regardless of which direction reform takes. This week was no exception.

 

Painting a grim picture for primary care, USA Today reported the number of U.S. medical school students going into primary care has dropped by more than 50% since 1997. Regardless of the reason for the drop – whether it is longer hours, lower pay or less glamour than being, say, a brain surgeon – the bottom line is that the physician shortage only looks to intensify in the years ahead.

 

 

This means that retail-based clinics will play an increasingly important role in today’s healthcare system, helping to serve on the frontlines of U.S. health care. This already is becoming evident as such clinic operators as MinuteClinic, Take Care Health Systems and RediClinic expand their service offerings. However, this also is playing out in other branches of the convenient care industry, such as with operator Roadside Medical Clinic + Lab, which operates a network of retail health clinics for over-the-road professional truck drivers.

 

 

Through a licensing deal with emergency room physician Dr. Royce Brough, Roadside Medical is expanding by 11 sites throughout six states. The mission of Roadside Medical: To deliver convenient health care to professional drivers coast to coast – 4.2 million over-the-road professional drivers to be exact. This expansion shows where people who pay for their own health care and have access issues (i.e., truckers, many of who are self-employed, private contractors who pay for their own coverage) go when they need care.

 

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Stiefel zaps acne segment with ‘leave-on’ treatment

BY Michael Johnsen

DULUTH, Ga. Stiefel Labs, a GlaxoSmithKline company, launched one of the first “leave-on” treatments for acne care, PanOxyl, as a line extension to the company’s acne-care bar and wash.

The formulation is not greasy as compared with spot treatments, and blends into the skin upon application. The new formulation delivers 10% Benzoyl Peroxide in a foam delivery.

In addition to consumer ad support, Stiefel will be fielding its 200-strong dedicated representatives to detail dermatologists.

Stiefel also introduced its Sensitive Sarna eczema itch relief kit, an all-in-one kit that includes a cleanse, itch relief and moisturizer.

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New directors elected to NACDS Foundation board

BY Drug Store News Team

ALEXANDRIA, Va. The National Association of Chain Drug Stores has elected three new directors to the board of the NACDS Foundation.

Jim VanLieshout, VP retail sales with Apotex; Alice Swearingen, VP channel development sales for GlaxoSmithKline; and Chris Dimos, president of pharmacy operations for Supervalu, will fill vacancies on the board, which consists of 22 members. 

“We are pleased to welcome the three new members to the NACDS Foundation board of directors,” said Edith Rosato, president of the NACDS Foundation.

“They will continue the strong representation on the board of chains and suppliers alike. We value their expertise, dedication and commitment to the industry, and we look forward to working together for the good of the public and the patients served by community pharmacy.”

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