PHARMACY

Report: Many Type 1 diabetics have other immune diseases

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK — Many children with Type 1 diabetes have other autoimmune disorders as well, according to published reports.

Citing findings in a recent study of nearly 500 children published in the journal Diabetes Care, Reuters reported that one-third of children with the disease — an autoimmune disorder in which the immune system attacks the cells of the pancreas — also have such disorders as celiac disease, autoimmune thyroid disease and a disorder of the adrenal glands called Addison’s disease.

For example, one-quarter of the children had antibodies related to thyroid disease, while one-eighth of those children had the disease; one-eighth of the children had the antibodies for celiac disease, while one-quarter of those children had the disease.

About 25.8 million Americans have diabetes, and Type 1 diabetes accounts for about 5% of all diagnosed cases in adults, according to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, part of the National Institutes of Health.

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United Water, NCPA encourage proper disposal of medications

BY Michael Johnsen

HARRINGTON PARK, N.J. — United Water and the National Community Pharmacists Association on Thursday announced a partnership to encourage people throughout the United States to properly dispose of their unused or expired medications in an environmentally friendly manner.

A major part of the campaign will center around the NCPA’s website dedicated to the program — DisposeMyMeds.org — that directs people to their local independent pharmacy where they can drop off their unused medications.

"Some trace levels of pharmaceutical compounds have been detected in waterways throughout the world," stated Brent Fewell, VP environmental compliance at United Water. "With no technology available today to effectively remove prescription drugs from water, proper disposal is currently our only remedy." In addition to the DisposeMyMeds.org program, Fewell noted that United Water also is spearheading leading-edge research initiatives aimed at removing compounds from the water.

"The presence of pharmaceuticals in the nation’s water should come as no surprise," NCPA president Robert Greenwood said. "The old recommended method of getting rid of many medications had been to flush them down the toilet or pour them down the drain."

Greenwood explained that the conventional wisdom was to dispose of medicines by flushing them down toilets, rather than disposing of them in trash, to prevent them from falling into the wrong hands. "Now we realize the potential impact of some pharmaceutical compounds in our waterways and the new emphasis on an environmentally safer means of disposal," he said.

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CDC: Half of all states have smoke-free worksites, restaurants and bars

BY Michael Johnsen

ATLANTA — By 2020 or sooner, the entire nation could have laws banning smoking in all indoor areas of private sector worksites, restaurants and bars, a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released Thursday has found.

The projection is based on the rate at which states have been adopting comprehensive smoke-free laws. In just the past 10 years, 25 states and the District of Columbia have enacted these laws, the CDC reported.

The study, published in this week’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, listed the smoke-free status of every state and the District of Columbia. In addition to listing the states with comprehensive smoke-free laws and years they went into effect, the report also listed the 10 states that have laws prohibiting smoking in one or two — but not all three — of the venues included in the study.

It also identified eight states that have less restrictive laws, such as those allowing smoking in designated areas or areas with separate ventilation. And the study detailed the seven states that have no statewide smoking restrictions in place for private worksites, restaurants or bars: Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, South Carolina, Texas, West Virginia and Wyoming.

"Eliminating smoking from worksites, restaurants and bars is a low-cost, high-impact strategy that will protect nonsmokers and allow them to live healthier, longer, more productive lives while lowering healthcare costs associated with secondhand smoke," CDC director Thomas Frieden said. "While there has been a lot of progress over the past decade, far too many Americans continue to be exposed to secondhand smoke at their workplaces, increasing their risk of cancer and heart attacks."

For a list of states and the types of smoke-free laws in each, view the full report at CDC.gov/mmwr.

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