HEALTH

Reducing sugar, increasing fiber intake may curb Latino teens’ risk for Type 2 diabetes

BY Michael Johnsen

CHICAGO Reducing sugar intake by the equivalent of one can of soda per day and increasing fiber intake by the amount equivalent to one half cup of beans per day appears to improve risk factors associated with Type 2 diabetes in Latino adolescents, according to a report in the April issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Almost 40% of Mexican American adolescents between the ages of 12 and 19 were overweight or at risk for being overweight from 2003 to 2006, according to background information in the article.

“Latino children are more insulin resistant, and thus more likely to develop obesity-related chronic diseases than their white counterparts,” the authors wrote. “To date, only a few studies have examined the effects of a high-fiber, low-sugar diet on metabolic health in overweight youth, and to our knowledge, none have tested the effects of this type of intervention in a mixed-sex group of Latino youth.”

Emily Ventura of Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California and colleagues conducted a 16-week study to examine if reductions in added sugar intake or increases in fiber intake would affect risk factors for developing Type 2 diabetes in 54 overweight Latino adolescents (average age 15.5). Participants were split into three groups: control, nutrition (receiving one nutrition class per week) or nutrition plus strength training (receiving one nutrition class per week along with strength training twice a week).

The results: 55% of participants decreased their sugar intake by an average of 47 grams per day (equal to the sugar in one can of soda) and 59% increased their fiber intake by an average of 5 grams per day (equal to the fiber in a half cup of beans) across all intervention groups, including controls. Participants who decreased their sugar intake had an average 33% decrease in insulin secretion and those who increased their fiber intake had an average 10% reduction in visceral adipose tissue volume.

“A reduction in visceral fat indicates a reduction in risk for Type 2 diabetes, considering that to a greater degree than total body fat, visceral fat [fat surrounding the internal organs] has been shown to be negatively associated with insulin sensitivity,” the authors noted. “Our results suggest that intensive interventions may not be necessary to achieve modifications in sugar and fiber intake. Accordingly, nutritional guidance given in the primary care or community setting may be sufficient to promote the suggested dietary changes in some individuals. … In addition, policies that promote reduced intake of added sugar and increased intake of fiber could be effective public health strategies for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes in this high-risk population.”

KelloggsDRSNhttp://www.centerstoregrowth.com

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Icy Hot maker Chattem feels the economic slump

BY Michael Johnsen

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. The economy is taking its toll on consumer-packaged goods manufacturers, as inventory cut-backs and retail and increased promotional spending prove to be a drag on earnings.

“While total revenues in the first quarter were lower than expected, we remain confident about the strength of our brands and our prospects for the balance of fiscal 2009,” stated Zan Guerry, Chattem chairman and CEO, in announcing the company’s first quarter results for the period ended Feb. 28. “Retail sales of our existing brands as measured by A.C. Nielsen and mass merchandiser point-of-sale data, excluding the discontinued Icy Hot Heat Therapy and Icy Hot Pro Therapy, increased by approximately 5% and 6% for the four and thirteen weeks ending March 21, 2009, respectively.”

Chattem reported that total revenues for the first quarter of fiscal 2009 were $116.1 million, representing a 3.9% decrease. The decrease in total revenues was due primarily to a $4.3 million reduction in international revenues, the company reported, but the balance of the decrease was related to lower sales of Icy Hot, Selsun, Bullfrog and Dexatrim, “caused in part by the timing of shipments, reduced retail inventory levels and two fewer shipping days in the first quarter of fiscal 2009,” the company stated.

The recall last year of the air-activated, self-heating Icy Hot Heat Therapy patch product was also a factor, Chattem noted.

Also adversely impacting Chattem total revenues was an increase in promotional programs that are recorded as a reduction of revenue rather than as advertising and promotion expense, the company added.

Advertising and promotion expense in the first quarter of fiscal 2009 decreased by $5.9 million to $28.6 million, or 24.6% as a percentage of total revenues as compared with 28.6% of total revenues in the prior year quarter. A&P expense was lower for the first quarter of fiscal 2009 due in part to an increase in promotion programs utilized by retailers that were recorded as a reduction of revenue rather than A&P expense and price efficiencies realized on certain media purchases.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

OTC product sales increased 2.4% in 2008, new research reveals

BY Michael Johnsen

LITTLE FALLS, N.J. Manufacturers’ sales of over-the-counter drugs grew by 2.4% to $18.3 billion in 2008, according to the latest research in Nonprescription Drugs USA 2008: Market Analysis and Opportunities from worldwide consulting and research firm Kline & Company, released Tuesday.

Private-label OTC medicines were up 8.2% over the same time period, within which antacids and allergy medicines posted the highest growth last year, driven primarily by increases in sales of private-label omeprazole (Procter & Gamble’s Prilosec OTC) and cetirizine (Johnson & Johnson’s Zyrtec).

Allergy, asthma, and sinus medications were up 17.3% as a result of strong sales from Johnson & Johnson’s Zyrtec brand switch from Rx-to-OTC, as well as its equivalent private-label cetirizine; feminine products was another area that grew 7.3% in 2008 as a result of strong sales growth of personal lubricants, as well as the Rx-to-OTC switch brand Plan B by Barr Laboratories.

“By contrasting the overall growth rates for OTCs with the growth rates for private-label products we can easily make the case that more Americans were seeking value and using private-label in 2008,” stated Laura Mahecha, industry manager at Kline’s Healthcare practice.

Not all categories suffer from higher private-label growth, however, as some are able to maintain growth for branded products.

“During tough economic times, consumers are willing to spend more for some brands they are loyal to and that offer good efficacy,” Mahechas said.

If consumers view brands as being a commodity or not offering special advantages, conversely, they may be able to make the trade-off to private-label.

“As the recession continues into 2009, we expect to see increased ‘value messages’ as part of branded advertising to combat the impacts of private-label erosion. Branded OTCs may use advertising messages to stress the brand’s value, efficacy, safety, and possibly longer-lasting doses, which translates into fewer doses and therefore, costs less,” Mahecha said.

According to preliminary research for Kline’s upcoming report Impact of Recessions on the U.S. OTC Market, past declines during recessions have not been particularly steep for the industry. OTC sales declined two years in a row — from 1999 to 2000 — with overall manufacturers’ sales dropping 0.6%, and then it declined again from 2000 to 2001 by 0.5%.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?