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RediClinic announces Weigh Forward 2.0

BY Ryan Chavis

HOUSTON — RediClinic, a Texas-based operator of care clinics based in H-E-B grocery stores, on Tuesday announced the newest version of Weigh Forward, its weight and lifestyle management program, which is being dubbed Weigh Forward 2.0.

The new version is a response to new obesity treatment guidelines recently published by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, in conjunction with the American Heart Association, the American college of Cardiology and the Obesity Society.

"I was very pleased to see that NHLBI’s new guidelines strongly encourage physicians and other healthcare professionals to become actively involved in treating their overweight and obese patients, and that they recommend focusing on a combination of behavior modification, a low-calorie but nutritious diet, and physical activity to achieve and sustain desired weight loss and health improvement goals," Dr. David Katz, MD, MPH said. "Weigh Forward addresses all of these elements, and can serve as a turn-key solution for primary care providers who want to start implementing the guidelines in their practices or clinics."

Dr. Katz is the founding director of Yale University’s Prevention Research Center and has more than 25 years of clinical and research experience in weight, lifestyle and disease management.

Weigh Forward is a 10-week program that combines 15-minute visits with a healthcare professional with access to a comprehensive online platform that supports both the patient and the clinician. The program has four core components: a medical component, which includes physical exams and biometric testing; a behavior modification component, which identifies each patient’s barriers to success and offers strategies to overcome them; a diet and nutrition component, complete with meal plans and nutritious recipes; and a physical activity component, which features customized fitness regimens for each patient.

 

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CVS Caremark Charitable Trust disperses 25 $1,000 grants as a part of CVS Caremark’s #GivingTuesday initiative

BY Michael Johnsen

WOONSOCKET, R.I. — The CVS Caremark Charitable Trust, a private foundation created by CVS Caremark, on Tuesday announced the 25 organizations that will receive $1,000 in grants as a part of CVS Caremark’s #GivingTuesday initiative, which invited CVS Caremark colleagues to nominate an organization in their community to receive a grant from the CVS Caremark Charitable Trust.

"#GivingTuesday reminds us that the holiday season should go beyond shopping and be a special time of year when we give back to our local communities," stated Eileen Howard Boone, president of CVS Caremark Charitable Trust. "Through our #GivingTuesday initiative, we are not only providing deserving nonprofit organizations with funding, but we are honoring our colleagues who bring our values of caring and collaboration to life all year long by volunteering with organizations that are helping the people we serve, every day."

Dec. 3 marks the second annual #GivingTuesday, a national campaign created to spark a day of giving at the start of the annual holiday season, following Thanksgiving, Black Friday and Cyber Monday. It celebrates charities, individuals, schools, businesses and other community organizations who come together to support charitable causes, and encourages everyone to participate in a national day dedicated to giving back. 

Funding through the #GivingTuesday grant program will support 25 colleague-nominated organizations nationwide, including:

  • East Tennessee Children’s Hospital of Knoxville, Tenn.;
  • Danny Did Foundation of Chicago;
  • Flying Horse Farms by Paul Newman of Cleveland;
  • Food for Kids Backpacks to Go Program of Murraysville, Pa.;
  • Girl Scouts Rhode Island of Warwick, R.I.;
  • Girls Inc. of Dallas;
  • Special Olympics of Mount Pleasant, Mich.;
  • Waianae Boys and Girls Club of Waianae, Hawaii;
  • Hope in Bloom of Dedham, Mass.;
  • Providence Animal Rescue League of Providence, R.I.;
  • Wayside Waifs of Kansas City, Mo.;
  • American Brain Tumor Association of Chicago;
  • Happily Ever After League (HEAL) of Scottsdale, Ariz.;
  • Hospice of the Valley of Phoenix;
  • Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation of New York;
  • Michael J. Fox Foundation of New York;
  • Pancreatic Cancer Action Network of Manhattan Beach, Calif.;
  • T.J. Martel Foundation of Nashville, Tenn.;
  • Big Sister Association of Boston;
  • Lovin’ Spoonfuls of Boston;
  • Operation Homefront of San Antonio;
  • Pat Tillman Foundation of Chicago;
  • Wounded Warrior Project of Pittsburgh;
  • American Cancer Society of New York; and
  • Arizona Animal Welfare League of Scottsdale, Ariz.

 

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Survey: Consumers more likely to shop where retailers give back to charity

BY Ryan Chavis

RICHMOND, Va. — The economy may still be slowly inching its way toward recovery, but that hasn’t stopped Americans from feeling charitable this holiday season.

A survey revealed that 2-in-3 people say they’re planning on giving back during the final weeks of the year, either through financial contributions or volunteering. The findings also showed that 72% of consumers are more likely to shop where retailers also are giving back. Sixty-nine percent said knowing a business gives back impacts their purchase decision.

The poll of more than 1,000 adults was conducted by Ipsos Public Affairs on behalf of PlanG, a technology company that helps businesses integrate philanthropy into consumer offers.

“These findings underscore the fact that Americans are among the most generous people in the world, and that selflessness is particularly evident during this time of year,” Marti Beller, founder and CEO of PlanG said. “The survey also amplifies another telling aspect of the nation’s consumer behavior, and that is a propensity to shop at stores that are aligned with our personal beliefs and values.”

The poll also shed light onto checkout solicitations: 35% of Americans don’t like it when cashiers make requests to donate to organizations during checkout.

“The overwhelming reason why many consumers object to checkout solicitations is a lack of choice, an inability to select a charity that we have a personal connection to,” Beller said. “Imagine the impact a brand could have if it was able to connect shoppers with nonprofits that are relevant and special to them.”

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