HEALTH

Raising the bar in 
nutritional snacking

BY Michael Johnsen


The snack is back! Judging from the amount of growth within the 
nutritional bar category in the past year, snacking is definitely en vogue. 
Incremental annual sales totaled $117.5 million across food, drug and mass retailers, with the exception of Walmart, according to SymphonyIRI Group. Out of all over-the-counter growth categories for the 52 weeks ended April 17, nutritional bars as a category took in more dollars on top of what they had generated the year before than any other category, bar none. 


There are plenty of divergent consumers contributing to this growth — from dieters looking for a healthier snack solution to the athletically inclined seeking out the best calorie/protein/carbohydrate combo. General Mills last year introduced a 90-calorie version of its Fiber One snack bars, which contributed to 10% retail sales growth for this line in 2010, according to the company’s annual report. 


The consuming demographic also spans young and old. According to a February 2011 Mintel report, young adults are consuming the most nutrition and energy bars as meal-replacement solutions, and older adults are looking to nutrition bars as a healthy way to improve their overall diet. “Fifty-four percent of consumers say they don’t have enough time to eat breakfast. They want easy, grab-n-go choices that are still low in sugar and simple carbs,” stated Atkins CEO Monty Sharma speaking about the launch of six new Atkins Day Break products in April. 


Snacks sporting high protein and low sodium claims currently are experiencing the strongest growth, according to a SymphonyIRI Group report on snacking released in May. Annualized sales of high protein snacks are up 7.6%, and low-sodium snacks are up 6.2%.

 

The article above is part of the DSN Category Review Series. For the complete Nutritional Snacking Mid-Year Report, including extensive charts, data and more analysis, click here.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Boogie Wipes introduces Saline Soothers line for adults

BY Allison Cerra

BEAVERTON, Ore. — Little Busy Bodies has introduced its latest Boogie Wipes product line that caters to adults’ dry, chapped noses.

Saline Soothers are designed to provide adults with a more comfortable alternative to dry tissues, the company said. Little Busy Bodies entered the mucus management market in 2007 with Boogie Wipes, designed just for kids.

"The introduction of Saline Soothers is a natural extension of our line of products," said Little Busy Bodies cofounder and CEO Julie Pickens. "The reality is, adults have boogies too, and our noses get just as chapped and tender as our children’s. We knew Boogie Wipes were a better alternative to dry tissues for our kids and wanted adults to reap the benefits of a saline wipe as well."

Saline Soothers now are available in a resealable 15-count pack for $1.99 at Walgreens and soon will be in Walmart stores this summer. Saline Soothers also will be available in a 45-count mini tissue box beginning this fall.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

CHPA praises North Carolina’s passage of PSE sales blocking technology legislation

BY Allison Cerra

WASHINGTON — The North Carolina legislature passed a real-time, stop-sale system, which allows law-abiding citizens to access medicines containing pseudoephedrine, while stopping sales that exceed the legal limit.

The passage was lauded by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.

"Today’s passage of a real-time, stop-sale system is a victory for law-abiding North Carolinians who rely on access to medicines containing pseudoephedrine for cold and allergy relief. With the enactment of legislation implementing sales-blocking technology in the state, criminals seeking out basic medications in an effort to produce methamphetamine have lost," said Carlos Gutierrez, CHPA director of state government relations. "We urge [North Carolina state] governor [Bev] Perdue to sign the bill into law as it provides law enforcement with a critical tool, while allowing hardworking families to access the safe and effective medicines they need."

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?