PHARMACY

QS/1 announces signature capture tablet

BY Ryan Chavis

SPARTANBURG, S.C. – QS/1, a healthcare automation solutions provider, has announced the integration of Dell’s Latitude 10 tablet with its Pharmacy Management Systems. The Latitude 10 can be utilized as a wireless signature capture device for pharmacies with a drive-thru and also provides functionality in other areas.

“The Latitude 10 is more than a tablet,” Charles Garner, QS/1 Market Analyst said. “It is truly a full-functioning computer that you can carry around the pharmacy.”

The Latitude 10 comes with Windows 8 and runs QS/1’s NRx Pharmacy Management System through a client connection. This allows pharamcies to perform such duties as patient counseling in a quiet, isolated area of the store.

“It is ideal in a pharmacy setting because it comes with an optional ruggedized protective case,” Garner added. “It not only helps you collect signatures at the drive-thru, it also helps improve your pharmacy’s workflow by adding new patients, entering refills and working on patient outcomes.”

QS/1 customers interested in adding Dell Latitude 10 can contact QS/1 Upgrades to order.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
PHARMACY

NACDS issues statement on White House health reform meeting

BY Antoinette Alexander

ARLINGTON, Va. — The National Association of Chain Drug Stores has issued a statement regarding the participation of NACDS president and CEO Steve Anderson in a White House meeting Tuesday regarding implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

According to NACDS, the statement reads:



“Patients rely on their pharmacies as trusted sources of information on healthcare topics – even beyond medication issues. To live up to patients’ trust and expectations, pharmacies have taken steps throughout the implementation of the Affordable Care Act to help inform patients on subjects including health insurance exchanges – from distributing information to more formal roles in patient education.


“Pharmacies’ engagement has been very similar to patient outreach and education during the implementation of Medicare Part D. The same can be said for pharmacy’s ongoing work to help patients take their medications as prescribed, to foster awareness and accessibility when it comes to flu vaccinations, and to advance other forms of preventive care that have been identified as national priorities.


“We appreciate that community pharmacy was included in the meetings held today at the White House with groups representing various segments of healthcare delivery – this represents continued progress in raising awareness of community pharmacy’s value as the face of neighborhood healthcare. Pharmacy’s message is simple and remains consistent: every effort must be taken to present clear and accurate information to patients in a highly accessible and credible manner. Community pharmacy is ideally suited to serve as a highly effective partner when patient care and patient empowerment are the goals.”

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
PHARMACY

Study: Whooping cough vaccine may not prevent infection

BY Michael Johnsen

SILVER SPRING, Md. — A new study is helping to provide a better understanding of vaccines for whooping cough, the Food and Drug Administration announced Wednesday. Based on an animal model, the study shows that acellular pertussis vaccines licensed by the FDA are effective in preventing the disease among those vaccinated, but suggests that they may not prevent infection from the bacteria that causes whooping cough in those vaccinated or its spread to other people, including those who may not be vaccinated.

“This study is critically important to understanding some of the reasons for the rising rates of pertussis and informing potential strategies to address this public health concern,” said Karen Midthun, director of the FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, where the study was conducted. “This research is a valuable contribution and brings us one step closer to understanding the problem. We are optimistic that more research on pertussis will lead to the identification of new and improved methods for preventing the disease.” 

While the reasons for the increase in cases of whooping cough are not fully understood, multiple factors are likely involved, including diminished immunity from childhood pertussis vaccines, improved diagnostic testing and increased reporting. With its own funds plus support from the National Institutes of Health, the FDA conducted the study to explore the possibility that acellular pertussis vaccines, while protecting against disease, might not prevent infection.

“There were 48,000 cases reported last year despite high rates of vaccination,” commented Anthony Fauci, director of the NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. “This resurgence suggests a need for research into the causes behind the increase in infections and improved ways to prevent the disease from spreading.”

Whooping cough rates in the United States have been increasing since the 1980s and reached a 50-year high in 2012. Whooping cough is a contagious respiratory disease caused by Bordetella pertussis bacteria. Initial symptoms include runny nose, sneezing, and a mild cough, which may seem like a typical cold. Usually, the cough slowly becomes more severe, and eventually the patient may experience bouts of rapid, violent coughing followed by the “whooping” sound that gives the disease its common name, when trying to take a breath.

The study was published Nov. 25 in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?