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Purdue Pharma launches pharmacist awareness campaign around Butrans

BY Michael Johnsen

STAMFORD, Conn. — A recent survey indicates that pharmacists in the United States wish they had better resource materials to help them counsel patients about prescription opioid medications. To help meet this need, Purdue Pharma has launched an awareness campaign to address specific knowledge gaps among pharmacists, including dose initiation, dose titration and application related to its Schedule III extended-release transdermal opioid, Butrans.
 
“As pharmacists, we take to heart our responsibility in helping to manage our patients and counsel them on safely using any prescription medications,” said American Pharmacists Association member, Michele Matthews. “These materials should help reinforce pharmacists’ confidence in their knowledge of Butrans, allowing them to provide their patients proper guidance.”
 
According to the online poll, conducted by Harris Poll on behalf of Purdue Pharma in February among 503 pharmacists, 95% of pharmacists said counseling patients about prescription opioid medications is an important part of their role as a pharmacist. However, 72% wish they had better resource materials to help them counsel patients about prescription opioid medications.
 
When it comes to Butrans, while 95% of the pharmacists polled have heard of the product, 28% said they were extremely or very familiar with it. Overall, 44% of pharmacists are only somewhat familiar with Butrans.
 
The survey also revealed that 46% of pharmacists who have heard of Butrans demonstrated a lack of knowledge around the proper starting dose for opioid-naïve or opioid-experienced patients. 
 
Purdue is working with the American Pharmacists Association to distribute a series of pharmacist resources, including a Pharmacist Brochure and Initiation and Titration Guide, which will reach more than 20,000 pharmacists, including APhA members, to help encourage productive pharmacist-patient interactions about Butrans including proper dosing, application, rotation and disposal and safety. 
 
Purdue also will present a webcast about Butrans in the coming weeks that will be housed at bit.ly/1w6SV14.
 
“Pharmacists are often the last healthcare professional with whom a patient interacts with before using a medication, so they have the potential to make an impact on patients’ quality of care, if given the necessary information on prescription medications and treatments,” said Lisa Miller, executive director of Healthcare Education and Liaison Programs at Purdue. "Purdue strongly believes it is imperative that we provide pharmacists with essential information about opioid therapies to improve their understanding and encourage appropriate use for their patients.”
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The successes and challenges of state prescription drug monitoring programs

BY Wendy Cloe

The United States is in the midst of a prescription drug abuse epidemic as addiction, overdoses and deaths associated with non-medical drug use have risen dramatically over the last decade.1 In 2009, U.S. drug overdose deaths outnumbered motor vehicle accident deaths for the first time.1 To help combat this alarming trend, Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs are being utilized in states to identify prescription fraud, forgeries, doctor shopping and improper prescribing. These programs are used by prescribers and third party payers to provide good clinical medical care and promote patient safety.

The use of PDMPs has been found to positively influence the prescribing practices of medical practitioners.1 PDMPs can also be used by workers compensation entities, Medicaid departments, emergency providers and drug courts. Since states with proactive PDMPs typically have lower rates of treatment admissions, it is clear the use of PDMPs can have an impact on reducing overall healthcare treatment costs.1

 One problem limiting the positive impact of these programs is underutilization. Prescriber registration rates vary from state to state, with a median registration rate at 35%.2 A major obstacle to increased prescriber and dispenser participation in PDMPs is the disruption of workflow involved in retrieving this information. The use of standalone web portals in the existing PDMPs that don’t integrate via physician and pharmacy practice management systems is another deterrent to usage. 

A second obstacle within the current PDMP system is the lack of interoperability between the respective PDMPs. Without a federal mandate, states are developing unique systems that will make the exchange of data across state lines complex. The Department of Health and Human Services issued a report to Congress in September 2013, which suggested that states should require dispensers and prescribers to register with the state PDMP. HHS also recommended that real time access to the PDMP data should be enabled, and that PDMP activity be reported within minutes of a prescription being dispensed.1   

It appears that the states are responding to the HHS recommendations. In 2014, 30% of the states crafted legislation that would adjust the requirements for PDMPs. New York and Kentucky had previously passed laws mandating registration and use of the state PDMPs. In the 2014 legislative session, Pennsylvania and New Jersey introduced bills mandating registration and use by both practitioner and prescriber with penalties and/or licensure consequences for violators. In addition, Colorado, Iowa, and Oklahoma debated whether PDMP data sharing with bordering states should be permitted.  

Since pharmacies operate primarily with real time transactions, standard data sets would benefit PDMP utilization, as well as efficient patient care. The development of model state legislation, model interstate compacts and model contracts would also promote uniformity among the states. Other potentially beneficial steps would be the adoption of Federal uniform standards and incorporation of that data into EHR systems to improve utilization.  

This article provides just a small example of the need for improvements in healthcare IT and interoperability, while opening the door for those in the healthcare IT industry that are ready to deliver solutions to remedy these issues. 

1http://www.healthit.gov/sites/default/files/fdasia1141report_final.pdf. 2 Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Center of Excellence, Brandeis University. Bureau of Justice Assistance: Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Performance Measures Report: January 2009 through June 2012. 2013.


As the Emdeon Pharmacy Services director of government product development and manager of government affairs, Wendy Cloe focuses on supporting sales, operations and product teams with legislative and regulatory analysis. With 14 years of state and federal government relations experience, she has assisted in educating her employers and clients regarding policy changes in the healthcare insurance and PBM industries. Cloe is a graduate of the University of Indianapolis and an AHIP certified managed healthcare professional. She served on the Colorado All Payer Claims Database Advisory Committee, the Legislative Committee on the Colorado Association of Health Plans, Self-Insurance Institute of America Government Relations Committee and the Colorado Association of Commerce and Industry Legislative Committee.

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S.ARIENS says:
Oct-29-2014 10:20 pm

One often overlooked problem with the PMP's is the healthcare professional's ability to validate a drivers license with the state's BMV. With today's technology.. a grade schooler could produce a passable fake driver's license. The only people that are being caught by the PMP or those that are too lazy, cheap or stupid to get a fake driver's license.. those people who are in the business to divert drugs knows this weak link in the system. Now that hackers are getting into medical records http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/09/24/us-cybersecurity-hospitals-idUSKCN0HJ21I20140924?feedType=RSS&feedName=healthNews we should expect to see more and more insurance fraud... because we will have one less red flag.. of paying cash for Rxs.

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Congressional Dietary Supplement Caucus hosts luncheon celebrating DSHEA

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON — The Congressional Dietary Supplement Caucus hosted an educational briefing and luncheon for congressional staffers on Oct. 14, the day before the 20th anniversary of the passage of the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act. Congressional staffers learned the history and impact of the comprehensive law that created the modern dietary supplement industry and in the process ensured continued consumer access to a wide range of safe and regulated nutritional products. 
 
When signed into law by President Bill Clinton on Oct. 25, 1994, DSHEA crystalized Congress’ intent to officially recognize the role supplements can play in health promotion and in the prevention of chronic diseases, such as heart disease and osteoporosis. The legislation, for the first time, defined supplements as a distinct category of food products, established a new regulatory framework and created a mechanism for dealing with safety issues, regulated health claims and labeling. 
 
In addition, DSHEA provided for good manufacturing practices and established new government entities to review the regulations and to encourage research on dietary supplements. 
 
Twenty years later, the supplement industry, fueled by consumers’ continued interest in enhancing their health and wellbeing, has grown from around $4 billion in sales to $35 billion, with more than 150 million Americans taking dietary supplements annually.
 
The briefing was led by Scott Bass, a partner at Sidley and Austin, who was one of the lead industry negotiators with Congress and the Food and Drug Administration during the drafting of DSHEA; and Patricia Knight, founder of Knight Capitol Consultants. Knight was the chief of staff for DSHEA co-sponsor Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, and was one of the lead staffers responsible for drafting and the passage of DSHEA.
 
The Congressional Dietary Supplement Caucus hosts educational briefings throughout the year in cooperation with the leading trade associations representing the dietary supplement industry — the American Herbal Products Association, the Consumer Healthcare Products Association, the Council for Responsible Nutrition, the Natural Products Association and the United Natural Products Alliance. 
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