HEALTH

PSE sales tracking system nabs meth ring

BY Michael Johnsen

DALLAS Arkansas state police apprehended and arrested a methamphetamine ring, which had been attempting to acquire large quantities of the precursor ingredient pseudoephedrine at retail pharmacy. The police were tipped off thanks to information provided by LeadsOnLabs, an online system that helps track the illegal sale of PSE, the company announced Monday.

“Breaking up this meth ring was a big step in the fight against meth in the state of Arkansas,” stated Investigator Chris Anderson of the Arkansas state police. In this particular case, some of the individuals already had reached their legal monthly sales limit and were attempting to purchase more pills. The LeadsOnLabs system blocked a total of 43 transactions of the 235 that were attempted by this group.  Because LeadsOnLabs is an online logbook and provides real-time alerts, pharmacies across the state were made aware of this group and immediately were able to deny the sale of additional pills to these individuals.

“We commend the mighty efforts of the Arkansas state police, as well as various local law enforcement agencies, and the work they do to combat meth abuse in their state,” stated Dave Finley, president and CEO of LeadsOnLabs. “We are proud to be able to help them identify individuals and groups of meth makers. Through our partnership we hope to help them win the war against methamphetamines in the state of Arkansas.”

Arkansas instituted the LeadsOnLabs system statewide in an attempt to eradicate meth abuse in the state in 2008, under the direction of Attorney General Dustin McDaniel. The system has been credited with helping law enforcement bust meth labs and track down meth abusers across the state.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Nearly $3 million for TB research awarded under FDA’s Critical Path Initiative

BY Alaric DeArment

SILVER SPRING, Md. The Food and Drug Administration has awarded almost $3 million for tuberculosis research, the agency said Monday.

The FDA said it awarded $2.9 million to six research products to help with the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of TB under its Critical Path Initiative. The disease has seen increasing prevalence around the world, and two recent articles by the agency’s Office of Critical Path programs noted that advances are needed to shorten therapy and treat drug-resistant forms of the disease.

The Critical Path Initiative was created in 2004 to drive innovation in the development, evaluation and manufacturing of medical products.

“FDA recognized an urgent need for the engagement and leadership of public health institutions to promote this critical, but neglected, area of medical therapeutics,” FDA commissioner Margaret Hamburg said.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Advil makers encourage safe medication disposal

BY Michael Johnsen

MADISON, N.J. Pfizer Consumer Healthcare on Monday launched a consumer campaign encouraging Americans to clean out their medicine cabinets and properly dispose of unwanted, expired and recalled products.

Pfizer also is partnering with Suzy Cohen, author of “The 24-Hour Pharmacist,” to offer essential tips on medicine cabinet safety. “This campaign encourages people to take a few simple steps to help ensure the safety of everyone in their household,” Cohen said. “We all need to declutter and clean out our medicine cabinets.”

 

Arecent poll found that nearly half of Americans do not always look at the expiration date on over-the-counter medications before taking them, Pfizer noted. And to encourage consumers to do exactly that, Pfizer is providing a coupon for a free bottle of Advil to the first 500,000 eligible people who register.

 

 

Pfizer also is encouraging consumers to properly dispose of medicines, suggesting that when disposing of unwanted, expired or recalled products in the medicine cabinet, consumers should take precautions to ensure they protect children, pets and the environment from potentially negative effects. For example, no medicine should be disposed of by pouring into a sink, toilet or storm drain. The campaign directs consumers to consult their pharmacists on proper disposal practices, or to visit FDA.gov and search for “disposal.”

 

 

For consumers who wish to register for one of the 500,000 free bottles of Advil, Pfizer has established the website MedicineCabinetSafety.com.

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?