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Proxy advisory firms recommend that Actavis-Warner Chilcott deal go through

BY Alaric DeArment

PARSIPPANY, N.J. — Three independent proxy advisory firms are recommending that Actavis shareholders vote in favor of the company’s proposed acquisition of Warner Chilcott.

Actavis said Thursday that Institutional Shareholder Services, Glass Lewis and Egan-Jones had issued the recommendation regarding the $8.5 billion acquisition of Ireland-based Warner Chilcott, announced in May.

The deal is the subject of a meeting of Actavis shareholders that will take place on the morning of Sept. 10 at the Parsippany Hilton in Parsippany, N.J. Major regulatory authorities in Europe have approved the deal, which is still awaiting approval by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission.

 

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Giant-Landover brings total number of Peapod pickup spots to 20

BY Alaric DeArment

LANDOVER, Md. — Giant Food of Landover, Md., has opened 20 pickup locations with online grocer and sister company Peapod, the supermarket chain said.

Giant, owned by Ahold USA, announced the recent opening of three new locations, in Bowie, Md., Sterling, Va., and Chevy Chase, Md.

"We’re very excited to be working with our sister grocer Peapod so closely to execute our Giant Pick-up program, an excellent convenience for customers in the Mid-Atlantic region," Giant president Anthony Hucker said. "Our hybrid fuel station, paired with the ability to pick up groceries, is offering our customers an even deeper level of convenience."

The announcement closely follows one from fellow Ahold USA banner Stop & Shop, which operates in New York, New Jersey and New England. Stop & Shop said it would open nine new Peapod pickup locations in Massachusetts and Rhode Island, bringing its total to 27.

 

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Study: College-educated, middle-aged Americans most likely to pursue healthier behaviors

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON — Better-educated middle-aged Americans are less likely to smoke and more apt to be physically active than their less-educated peers. They also are more inclined to make healthy changes and adhere to them, according to a new study in the September issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

"This study documents that there are very large differences by education in smoking and physical activity trajectories in middle age, even though many health habits are already set by this stage of the life course," stated study author Rachel Margolis, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Western Ontario. "Health behavior changes are surprisingly common between ages 50 years and 75 years, and the fact that better-educated middle-aged people are more likely to stop smoking, start physical activity and maintain both of these behaviors over time has important health ramifications."

Margolis found that 15% of college-educated respondents smoked at some point between ages 50 years and 75 years, compared with 41% of college dropouts. There also were large differences by education in physical activity over the study period. For example, 14% of college-educated respondents were physically active at all interviews during the study period, compared with 2% of those with less than a high school education. 

Margolis also discovered that one’s level of education became decreasingly important as a moderator of healthy behavior changes upon diagnosis as age increased. Having more education increased the odds of smoking cessation among people in their 50s who were diagnosed with a new condition, but not those in their 60s or early 70s.

"Well-educated smokers in their 60s and early 70s are a small and select group," Margolis said. "They may be the most addicted or the most stubborn."

Another possible explanation for why well-educated smokers in their 50s were more likely to quit than those in their 60s and early 70s is that the longer people expect to live when they get sick, the more likely they are to make a healthy behavior change, Margolis said.

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