HEALTH

Prestige rides OTC crest in Q3 gains

BY Michael Johnsen

IRVINGTON, N.Y. — Prestige Brands posted gains of 22.7% in revenue, reaching $90.6 million for its third quarter ended Dec. 31.

The company’s revenue from its five core over-the-counter brands — Chloraseptic, Clear Eyes, Compound W, Little Remedies and The Doctor’s NightGuard — increased 14% over the period. That kind of sales story is expected to improve in the coming year as Prestige assumes the reigns of the recently acquired Dramamine and Blacksmith Brands’ stable of brands — including cough-cold brands PediaCare, Luden’s and NasalCrom.

"Our strategy for growing the core OTC brands is well under way,” stated Prestige president and CEO Matthew Mannelly. “Increased investment in advertising and promotion coupled with new product introductions resulted in strong sell through during the quarter,” he said. “Consumption for Prestige’s core OTC brands, including Blacksmith Brands, grew 26.5% during the quarter."

With the addition of Dramamine, Prestige now fields nine core OTC brands, Mannelly said, representing approximately 90% of its OTC segment revenue.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Pharmavite spokeswoman offers consumers advice about supplements shopping

BY Michael Johnsen

MISSION, Kan. — Pharmavite spokeswoman Suzy Cohen, a noted pharmacist, author and frequent talk show guest, on Monday offered fresh advice for consumers perusing the dietary supplement aisle.

"A recent study by the National Institutes of Health found that about 50% of the U.S. population use dietary supplements, a slight increase from previous studies," Cohen stated. "However, most users aren’t aware that all vitamins are not created equal, and you can’t always believe everything printed on a label."

Cohen advised consumers to consult a physician or pharmacist on any new supplement regimen and to look for a “USP-Verified” seal on any supplement. Cohen also suggested consumers to do their research at such websites as the American Academy of Family Physicians’ FamilyDoctor.org for credible, physician-reviewed information on health-and-wellness topics.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

NAD turns Iceberg Labs over to federal regulators regarding Immune Shield claims

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK — The National Advertising Division of the Council of Better Business Bureaus on Tuesday referred advertising claims made by Iceberg Labs for its Immune Shield dietary supplement to the Federal Trade Commission and Food and Drug Administration for further review.

The advertising at issue was challenged before NAD, the advertising industry’s self-regulatory forum, by the Council for Responsible Nutrition.

One of the claims Iceberg Labs makes is that its supplements are preventive of any form of influenza, a potential sore spot for FTC regulators. During the H1N1 pandemic, the FTC publicly warned companies that “unless they have scientific proof for their claims, they are violating federal law and must drop the claims or face further action.” In collaboration with other enforcement agencies, including the FDA, the FTC then pledged to aggressively work to identify, investigate and take additional regulatory and law enforcement action against individuals or businesses that deceptively promote purported H1N1 products.

Iceberg Labs’ “magic pill” also purports to serve as a weight-loss aid. The company also suggested that its products may prevent cancer. Following NAD’s initial inquiry, the advertiser contacted NAD but did not submit supporting evidence for its claims.

NAD noted in its decision that it was disappointed that the advertiser did not participate in NAD’s inquiry, “particularly in light of the strong health claims being made, including claims that the product will ‘fortify’ the immune system, prevent ‘any form of flu’ and, most troubling, claims suggesting that this supplement will help prevent and eliminate cancer.”

Based on the advertiser’s failure to respond to NAD’s inquiry, pursuant to Section 2.9 of the NAD/NARB Procedures, NAD will refer this matter to the FTC and FDA for further review.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?