PHARMACY

Pozen, AstraZeneca file suit against Dr. Reddy’s over generic Vimovo

BY Allison Cerra

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — A generic drug maker is being sued for patent infringement for its version of a fixed-dose combination drug co-created by Pozen and AstraZeneca.

Pozen and AstraZeneca on Monday said that they have filed the suit in the U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey against Dr. Reddy’s. The drug makers said Dr. Reddy’s is seeking approval from the Food and Drug Administration for its generic version of Vimovo (naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium) delayed-release tablets prior to the patent’s expiration date. Vimovo currently has regulatory exclusivity through April 30, 2013, Pozen and AstraZeneca said.

The filing of this patent infringement lawsuit by AstraZeneca and Pozen within 45 days of receipt of Dr. Reddy’s notice letter will result in the FDA automatically instituting a stay or bar of final approval of Dr. Reddy’s abbreviated new drug application for up to 30 months, or until a final court decision is entered in the infringement suit in favor of Dr. Reddy’s, whichever occurs first.

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PHARMACY

Marc’s aims for low prices

BY Jim Frederick

Cleveland, Ohio-based Marc’s will sell almost anything, provided it can price the item low and turn it quickly. But it won’t sell shrunken heads.


“We went to one customs auction a while ago and bought some artifacts,” said company founder Marc Glassman in a recent YouTube video. “Then we found out we’d bought some real shrunken heads from Peru. We were quite embarrassed.”


Heads aside, Glassman’s eccentric, eclectic retail brainchild is thriving — in part by defying retail norms. In an era of just-in-time logistics, the 60-store Marc’s chain — Glassman also owns five-store Xpect in Connecticut — doesn’t hesitate to buy multi-truckload quantities of deal and closeout merchandise to lock in a low price.


“With 60 stores, we have well over 1 million sq. ft. of warehouse, just to … bring stuff in,” Glassman said. “Some stuff we bring in six to eight months before the season, but if you’re buying closeouts — especially seasonal closeouts — you have to buy when it’s there.”


“We just want to turn products fast at the lowest prices,” Glassman said. “Literally no one in the country marks closeouts as low as we do.”


The discounts extend to the chain’s more than 50 pharmacies, with a $3.99 price point on more than 400 generic drugs and everyday low prices on diabetic supplies, blood-pressure monitors, digital thermometers, reading glasses, dietary supplements and more.

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Navarro refines shopability

BY Antoinette Alexander

Navarro Discount Pharmacy, the largest 
Hispanic-owned pharmacy retailer in the United States is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. And it is on an aggressive growth track as it enhances its service offerings and looks to open as many as 21 new stores over the next three years.


“2010 was a very exciting year for our company in terms of really being able to set the strategy and beginning to execute on the strategy in terms of our growth plans, and even some of the key initiatives we rolled out in store,” said Cristy Leon-Rivero, VP marketing. “We remodeled and came up with a ‘model service store’ within the year.”


While many of the services — such as a pediatric pharmacy window for busy parents, in-store health events and free prescription delivery — are available in other store locations, the model customer service store brings together under one roof the ultimate in customer service. This 24-hour test store, which is located on Sunset Drive in Miami, opened in mid-2010.


This store, as well as a few others, also includes the chain’s new “structured function” model, which organizes over-the-counter products by health state, versus by brand, to ease category shopability. The redesign includes brand line extensions and a broadened assortment, plus 6 ft. of additional shelf space for children’s needs.

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