HEALTH

Pollen.com identified as reliable source for health information

BY Michael Johnsen

PLYMOUTH MEETING, Pa. SDI on Wednesday announced that its Pollen.com allergy site received the Health On the Net Foundation’s Code of Conduct certification, identifying it as an internationally reliable source of health information.

Pollen.com’s audience has grown by more than 466% since the site’s launch in 2002. In April 2009, the site and network had more than 26.5 million page views.

“With our growing audience, the Health On the Net certification gives our visitors and advertisers further confidence that the information we are providing is a gold standard – it’s trustworthy, timely and credible,” stated Glenn Connery, associate director of the application development/Web group for SDI.

Certification by HON means that Pollen.com provides sound, authoritative information; data confidentiality and privacy; proper attribution of sources; and transparency, such as a clear delineation of advertising and editorial content.

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RelayHealth collaborating with CDC to provide H1N1 information

BY Michael Johnsen

ATLANTA RelayHealth, a provider of healthcare connectivity services, is helping healthcare providers cope with the recent outbreak of influenza A (H1N1), and aiding the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with monitoring of influenza antiviral prescribing activity nationwide via an authorized prescription data feed, the company announced Monday.

“Our hope is that the H1N1 threat continues to moderate,” stated Jim Bodenbender, RelayHealth’s SVP and general manager. “But whatever the threat level, our secure online interactive tools are available to assist physicians enrolled on the RelayHealth network to keep their patients informed of the latest credible health information at any time.” 

Already, physicians are using RelayHealth’s HIPAA-compliant interactive service to broadcast messages securely over the Internet to their patients about the symptoms of H1N1 influenza and what to do if those patients think they have the disease, RelayHealth reported. RelayHealth has also made available H1N1 flu educational content on its network, which doctors can transmit to their patients

And RelayHealth’s Pharmacy Solutions Group is contributing to the national effort to track and limit the spread of the H1N1 flu by providing the CDC with a HIPAA-compliant data feed of antiviral prescriptions filled by a cross-sectional sample from more than 35,000 major chains, regional chains and independent pharmacies throughout the U.S. that have allowed their information to be shared.

RelayHealth provides the CDC with this authorized data feed every four hours, the company stated. On average, RelayHealth sends 400,000 to 500,000 prescription records daily to the CDC.

According to RelayHealth, the agency uses this data to monitor influenza antiviral prescribing activity across the country and shares the data with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

“Our ability to swiftly assemble the data on antiviral prescriptions for the CDC is playing a role in the nation’s emergency preparedness effort,” stated Jeff Felton, president of RelayHealth’s Pharmacy Solutions Group.

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ASGE: Electronic diagnosis provided inaccurate results for Barrett’s esophagus patients

BY Michael Johnsen

OAK BROOK, Ill. In a review of more than 2,000 patients coded for Barrett’s esophagus, electronic diagnosis overestimated the prevalence of the disease, according to researchers in California, the American Society for Gastroinestinal Endoscopy announced last week.

According to the review, researchers found that only 61.9% of patients assigned a billing diagnosis code for Barrett’s esophagus actually had Barrett’s esophagus after a manual record review.

The misdiagnosis could potentially undermine or skew future research into patients diagnosed with Barrett’s esophagus, a condition where the lining of the esophagus changes due to chronic inflammation, generally from gastroesophageal reflux disease. Definitive diagnosis requires a biopsy, taken at upper endoscopy, demonstrating replacement of the normal cell lining with one more like the cell lining of the small intestine. This is also known as intestinal metaplasia. Barrett’s esophagus itself has no specific symptoms, but this change can increase the risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (a type of esophageal cancer).

Researchers concluded that electronic coding alone overestimates the prevalence of Barrett’s esophagus, and most clinical and research uses will require a manual verification of disease status.

The study appears in the May issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal of the ASGE.

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