CENTER STORE

Poll: Americans opt for generic products to save money

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK Almost two-thirds of U.S. adults (65%) are purchasing more generic brands to save money, slightly up from 63% in February, a new Harris Interactive poll found.

Harris Interactive surveyed 2,227 adults online between June 14 and 21, and found that among those who have purchased generic brands to save money, a person’s age had no influence on his or her decision to forego branded products for generic ones. What’s more, an additional 13% of those polled said they have considered purchasing generic products to save money.

The Harris poll also found that U.S. adults seek other ways to cut corners: 2-in-5 adults said they have switched to refillable water bottles instead of purchasing bottles of water (39%), and brown-bag their lunches.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
CENTER STORE

Nielsen: CPGs should shift focus to baby boomers

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK As advertisers and consumer goods manufacturers focus on consumers ages 18 to 34 years, one marketing research firm said that one often-ignored group also has leverage in the buying game.

Nielsen reported that baby boomers — adults born between 1946 and 1964 — are an affluent group that seek new technology and brands like their descendents and hold 38.5% of CPG dollars, Nielsen revealed in a new report.

Nielsen also revealed that:

  • Dominate 1,023-out-of-1,083 consumer packaged goods categories
  • Watch the most video: 9:34 hours per day
  • Comprise 1/3 of all TV viewers, online users, social media users and Twitter users
  • Time shift TV more than 18-24s (2:32 vs. 1:32)
  • Are significantly more likely to own a DVD player
  • More likely to have broadband Internet access at home

“Boomers should be as desirable for marketers as Millennials and Gen-Xers for years to come; they are the largest single group of consumers, and a valuable target audience. As the U.S. continues to age, reaching this group will continue to be critical for advertisers,” said Pat McDonough, SVP insights, analysis and policy at Nielsen.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
CENTER STORE

Pepsi Max brings back classic commercial

BY Allison Cerra

PURCHASE, N.Y. In a multimedia marketing campaign that launched Monday, Pepsi Max has put a twist on the Pepsi “Diner” commercial that aired during Super Bowl XXIX.

Instead of having two soda delivery truck drivers go head-to-head over a can of Pepsi, they both want Pepsi Max, which has zero calories but still has the punch of a Pepsi.

“We’re looking our competition squarely in the eye and making an unabashed claim about the great taste of Pepsi Max. That’s why we’ve revamped one of our most memorable Super Bowl spots to excite our consumers, bottlers and customers,” said Lauren Hobart, chief marketing officer, carbonated soft drinks, PepsiCo Beverages Americas. “The TV commercial today begins one of our most ambitious marketing programs that will have unexpected iterations across a broad array of media channels. It is classic, in-your-face Pepsi marketing.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?