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PLMA consumer survey: Host of factors feeds consumer ‘buy’ decision

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK — A recent consumer survey debunked the two long-assumed scenarios surrounding the moment a shopper actually makes a shopping decision — before they’ve entered the store as part of a planned purchase or at the shelf on an impulse.

For years, the retailing industry has debated between those who argue a shopper’s mind is mostly made up before they even enter the store and those who assert the real decision what to buy comes down to a final few seconds at the shelf. In fact it is neither, according to a recent survey of U.S. consumers.

A study released Monday by the Private Label Manufacturers Association and Buxton consumer research determined that the decision-making process is influenced by a variety of factors from the kitchen table where the shopping list is created to the shelf where the product is taken. The nationwide poll of 1,170 shoppers found that shoppers tend to be engaged fully in a process for purchase decisions that starts with that list of items at home, visiting stores and walking the aisles, then considering a variety options and alternatives to their planned purchases prior to deciding what to buy at the shelves. 

Among the highlights from the survey findings:

Despite changes in consumer demographics, lifestyles and store formats, two-thirds of those surveyed say they rely on a list when doing the main household shopping for their family;

Brands are not often specified;

  • Six-out-of-10 shoppers say they list products by brand name only occasionally, rarely or never. However, half of these shoppers admit they frequently have a brand in mind, even when they don’t list it;

  • Lists — and brands — are less of a factor for drug chain shoppers. Nearly two-thirds say they don’t make a list for drug store purchases, and of those that do, only 2-out-of-10 will specify a brand;

  • Once inside a store, shoppers become browsers and walk through the store looking for items on their list but also pay attention to special displays, promotions, product sampling and demonstrations; and

  • Half of all shoppers say they would buy a store brand if the national brand were not available. Only 23% say they would buy another national brand instead. A mere 14% would go to another store.

To follow up on the Buxton research and its implications for the private-label industry, PLMA will host a special seminar program on Nov. 13, in conjunction with the association’s 2011 Private Label Trade Show in Chicago.

For the full report, click here


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Nestlé Pure Life implements Pink Pack program

BY Allison Cerra

STAMFORD, Conn. — In line with its partnership with the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Nestlé Waters said that its Nestlé Pure Life brand is continuing its support of breast cancer awareness and research through its Pink Pack retail program.

How it works: 10 cents will be donated to BCRF for every "pink pack" of Nestlé Pure Life water produced, with a minimum donation of $350,000. Available at retailers nationwide, as well as in Canada, the special packs are marked with a symbolic pink ribbon and the BCRF logo, Nestlé Pure Life said.

"Through the Pink Pack program, Nestle Pure Life brand bottled water has become a valuable BCRF partner in our fight against breast cancer," BCRF director of marketing Robbie Finke Franklin said. "We are thrilled that a leading company such as Nestlé Waters shares our mission of finding a cure in our lifetime and we look forward to the day when this disease is eliminated."

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30,000 Kraft employees volunteer to make a ‘delicious difference’

BY Allison Cerra

NORTHFIELD, Ill. — As part of its annual week of volunteer service, Kraft Foods said that about 30,000 employees from 60 countries will improve communities around the world.

Last year, Kraft Foods employees contributed nearly 155,000 volunteer hours during "Delicious Difference Week" — more than triple since 2008 — and this year expects to garner upwards of 200,000 volunteer hours. Employees this year will team up with both global and local nonprofits, including Feeding America, Helen Keller International, KaBoom!, Save the Children and INMED Partnerships for Children.

"Our employees play a vital role in their communities all year long — serving lunch at local soup kitchens, teaching children about health and nutrition, building playgrounds, planting community gardens, and in so many other ways," Kraft chairman and CEO Irene Rosenfeld said. "And with more than 700 volunteer events in 60 countries this year, it will undoubtedly be our biggest and most impactful week of volunteer service ever."

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