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Pillar Rock USA launches JetRyte, a nutritional supplement formulated to combat jet lag

BY Michael Johnsen

GREAT NECK, N.Y. — Pillar Rock USA recently introduced JetRyte, a nutritional supplement formulated to combat jet lag. 
 
Suffering from jet lag is a common temporary disorder, resulting from air travel of two or more hours. Now travelers can fight the effects of jet lag with an effervescent tablet. The JetRyte tablets, designed to fit into any water bottle, will dissolve in two minutes or less. Ingredients include sodium, potassium, vitamins B-6, B-12 and C, magnesium, melatonin and other nutrients combined with a citrus flavor. 
 
Each JetRyte package contains three tablets and a pair of earplugs, and retails between $4.99 and $5.99. 
 
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HDMA report explores biosimilar marketplace potential in the U.S.

BY Michael Johnsen

ARLINGTON, Va. — A new study published Thursday by the Center for Healthcare Supply Chain Research (HDMA’s nonprofit research foundation) — Biosimilars: Lessons from Europe and Strategies for the U.S. — identifies factors, based on an analysis of European models, that may affect the American launch of biosimilars and their marketplace potential in the United States.
 
“In a little more than five years, about $55 billion of the U.S.’s original biologics will lose exclusivity,” said Karen Ribler, EVP and COO of the Center for Healthcare Supply Chain Research. “As the U.S. market awaits FDA guidance on biosimilars, it is useful to look at Europe for a road map of how these products can be adopted in the U.S.”
 
By reviewing the European experience, the publication found that the commercialization and adoption of biosimilars varied throughout five countries — including France, Germany, Italy, the United Kingdom and Romania — but the amount of regulation in place and stakeholder alignment both tended to shape the overall uptake of these products. Among the factors found to drive European biosimilar adoption: 
 
  • A minimum threshold of physician acceptance, which is linked to their understanding of the category, is necessary for prescribing biosimilar medications. This behavior varies by country, disease state and type of treatment;
  • Substitutability does accelerate adoption in markets where it exists, but market players are able to achieve high adoption of biosimilar use even where substitutability is not an option;
  • Payers influence uptake in adoption through aggressive use of various tactics like utilization quotas;
  • Commercial support, including sales force and patient services, is often necessary to obtain biosimilar uptake;
  • More entrants, while increasing competitive intensity and price pressures, also typically result in higher publicity, which boosts market penetration; and
  • Biobetters may limit biosimilar uptake when they offer better convenience, lower cost or an enhanced drug profile in terms of safety or efficacy.
The report then applies the lessons learned from Europe to the U.S. healthcare environment, taking into account stakeholder influence, payer structure and marketplace dynamics. With many determinants for biosimilars being unknown, the report offers a discussion based on the present, as well as scenarios for possible commercialization. Areas discussed include: interchangeability, substitutability, the use of international data, naming conventions and stakeholder influence.
 
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Walgreens expresses support of diversity in series of YouTube videos

BY Michael Johnsen

 
 
DEERFIELD, Ill. — Walgreens on Thursday released a series of YouTube videos explaining facets of the chain's operations — healthcare, omnichannel retailing and store operations — and how each of those areas support diverse communities. 
 
"Walgreens is meeting the critical needs of healthcare access by doing two things from a service or needs perspective," said Jeff Kang, Walgreens SVP health and wellness. The first is helping the uninsured get health insurance on the Health Exchange. And second, Walgreens provides convenient access to basic primary care services in its stores. But more important, Walgreens provider base of pharmacists and practitioners is culturally diverse. "That's really the power of Walgreens," Kang added. "Through our stores we actually mirror the communities we're serving, speak their language, reflect their race and cultures, and that's really what makes us very effective in meeting the critical needs of healthcare access in this country."
 
 

 
Sona Chawla, president, digital and chief marketing officer for Walgreens, explained how Walgreens serves a diverse customer base utilizing deep customer insights. "Our customer insights help us understand how … customer behavior is evolving," she said. "We're able to do what Charles Walgreen envisioned all the way back in 1901, provide that kind of unique and distinct customer care [and] we're able to scale that across our 8,000-plus locations and all of our different channels."
 
 

 
"Walgreens supports economic development in many of America's diverse communities," said Mark Wagner, president, operations and community management for Walgreens, on the company's commitment to supplier diversity and economic development. Walgreens does that in a number of ways, Wagner said, including the hiring of a diverse community to both build and staff its stores, as well as buying goods and services from minority-owned and woman-owned companies. "There's no other retailer that has the reach into the diverse communities across America like Walgreens, so when we say we can move the needle, we can move it in a big way."
 
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