News

Pfizer offers many paths to a rewarding career

BY DSN STAFF

Pfizer Consumer Healthcare follows many routes to attract its next generation of business leaders. As one of the largest over-the-counter healthcare companies in the world, with a global footprint in more than 90 countries, they have ample opportunities.

(Click here to view the complete Future Leaders Summit report.)

To appeal to millennials and groom them as the next generation of talent, PCH leverages grassroots methods, including sourcing through social platforms and references, according to Lisa Paley, chief customer officer.

In addition, the company has well-thought-out summer work programs and internships that offer participants visibility and exposure to different parts of Pfizer on a short-term basis. This allows them to network with other students and PCH colleagues. Recent participants shared their appreciation that they were given a chance to really get involved in the company and that they felt they were trusted as members of the team.

“At our Richmond R&D site, we are partnering with universities in new ways to ensure there is a bridge to this new generation of technical talent, including career days sponsored by our Women’s Leadership Program,” Paley added.

Employees are developed through a balance of formal training and skill-teaching fused with informal opportunities to quickly learn and grow through different work experiences. “Many take advantage of our mentoring program,” Paley said. “We pride ourselves on the access colleagues have to network with and learn from senior leaders early in their careers.”

PCH has an impressive retention rate attributed to the focus on overall engagement and efforts to foster an environment to enhance the company’s reputation as an engaging place to work. The features encompass everything from casual dress Mondays and Fridays to internal networking events. This empowers employees to have a voice and make a difference — something that is important to the millennial generation. Paley added that PCH fosters a culture of recognition through internal meeting venues and social platforms.

Passion is a word linked to the new workforce, and opportunities to be involved abound. “We create opportunities for colleagues to pursue their passions, practice creativity and participate in extra- curricular activities,” said Paley, citing such examples as volunteer days and co-ed sports teams.

PCH has an entire toolkit available and readily accessible to help its employees change and adapt to ever-changing business conditions. Among those to help empower and inform colleagues are digital tools, such as a robust online learning center and social forums, colleague resource groups and guest speakers providing an external perspective. These experts also help PCH stay abreast of emerging and future trends.

The characteristics of the emerging workforce present many benefits, Paley said. “Our biggest opportunity is to inspire this next generation of colleagues — show the higher purpose of healthcare companies to help people live healthier lives.” She added, “we also must find ways to unlock the entrepreneurialism in our colleagues so we can compete with startups.” The new generation tends to prefer input and immediate feedback more than predecessors, she noted, prompting the need to find a way to balance the needs of current and incoming talent by being adaptive and recognizing motivators.

“One of the challenges we have is to attract this ‘digital first’ generation — and soon ‘digital only’ generation — all while continuing to attract and successfully drive collaboration with other generations of talent,” she said.

Pfizer colleagues share a common passion for working in intellectually challenging environments to make the world a healthier place — no matter what stage in their career path.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
News

Beiersdorf: Supporting employee development with growth

BY DSN STAFF

Grappling with a new breed in the workforce can be a challenge, but Beiersdorf sees it as more of an opportunity to grow employees and the company alike.

(Click here to view the complete Future Leaders Summit report.)

“At Beiersdorf, we are cognizant of the needs of our changing workforce and work diligently to retain these important resources through our total rewards and career development programs,” said Lou Fata, director of field sales. “These ‘high-potentials’ want the investment by the company to mirror their own investment in their careers. Ongoing feedback and communication, timely and relevant recognition, and interesting assignments are critical to capture and maintain the interest and engagement of our burgeoning new talent.”

Fata noted that “global Beiersdorf” is taking steps aimed at building its next generation of new leaders. For instance, the company has allocated “headcount funding” to strategically critical areas, such as e-commerce and digitalization, with the objective of nurturing corporate and employee development alike.

Toward an identical end, Fata said managers strive to “build development opportunities organically”— for instance, through challenging assignments that require aspiring leaders to “stretch” their capabilities to address the tasks at hand, as well as via special projects.

Additionally, managers include employees in external share groups and industry organization memberships, special training opportunities and global workshops and projects. Internal functional programs allow employees to gain critical business competencies in their areas and/or to be identified to participate in special leadership and managerial excellence programs.

Similar concerted efforts are made to retain talent. These efforts encompass competitive total reward programs and the opening of doors for employees to further develop their careers in the United States and at other Beiersdorf affiliates entities abroad if they desire to be globally assigned. Each year, employees are evaluated and rewarded for their performance, as well as for the roles they have played in bolstering their departments’ growth potential and that of the Beiersdorf organization as a whole.

Employees also get the tools they need to adapt to changing business conditions and grow rapidly in the process. “As a sales organization, our teams manage their own P&Ls and are empowered to invest trade monies in the most effective and efficient programs to drive the business,” Fata stated. “As business conditions change, they have the autonomy to adjust and re-invest as they see fit in order to capitalize on emerging trends or changing market conditions.”

What’s more, employee development plans are constructed not only with the company’s desires in mind, but also in keeping with each employee’s interest in having a rich and varied career with Beiersdorf. An annual employee engagement program to ensure that all employees’ voices are heard, as well as each local affiliate and its managers, seeks to understand what actions drive increased employee involvement with the company and its brands.

“We feel it is important to continually cultivate all employees through career development planning,” Fata said. “Not only does it benefit the individual employee’s desires; it also creates more value and productivity, helping us to ultimately achieve our end goal of a successful Beiersdorf.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
News

GSK offers a world of opportunities

BY DSN STAFF

GlaxoSmithKline employs more than 100,000 people around the globe. But its size doesn’t inhibit the company from having a very personal approach to grooming its future leaders.

(Click here to view the complete Future Leaders Summit report.)

The first point of entry is the Future Leaders Program, which targets stand-out candidates as they graduate from universities. GSK is willing to give graduates a chance to get their first working experience. “Their mind is like an unwritten book,” said Line De Decker, VP human resources for Europe and Americas at GSK Consumer Health. “They go on a rotation program that offers so many experiences they can learn from.”

Participants in the Future Leaders Program gain broad-ranging experience working across a variety of business functions. During the rotations, employees experience different roles from marketing and sales to communications and supply chain. Throughout the program, GSK managers and mentors are readily available to help accelerate the learning and set the candidates on the path to success.

The Future Leaders Program typically selects graduates through a competitive process. “They really are the leaders for the future of our company,” De Decker said. “We want the best and the brightest.”

To attract employees with prior commercial experience and MBA degrees on their resumes, GSK has the Esprit Program. This also is a rotational program curated to craft tomorrow’s leaders. The Esprit associates take on a series of stretching commercial management roles, both within their home region and international markets. “I am so impressed with every single one of the Esprit associates I have interacted with,” De Decker said.

GSK also has innovative initiatives to retain its employees. One of its jewels is the Pulse Volunteer Project. “We send employees on a six-month mission to work with a nonprofit organization, such as Save the Children,” De Decker said.

The employees are matched with an interest, such as a physician who travels to a country to operate on children with eye disease. The opportunity is available to all GSK employees. Some success stories include Randy Easterly, a retail category solutions manager, who in 2010 spent six months working with Direct Relief International after a major earthquake hit Haiti. “Being a Pulse volunteer was one of the most rewarding things I have done in my life,” Easterly said. “During my time working with Direct Relief International, I was able to use my business skills that were developed at GSK to help Direct International. Pulse opens your eyes to a totally different world than you live in day to day.”

“This is a very original way of engaging people,” De Decker said. “They come back as better leaders and employees. They can put things into perspective, and they learn to think out of the box. It is a wonderful experience.”

It also dovetails nicely with millennials’ quest to “do good,” while also creating lifetime experiences. “They get to do something they care about and experience something they might never get to do in their careers,” De Decker added.

Not surprisingly, GSK has an enviably high retention rate. That also is supported by a development theory called 70-20-10. What this refers to is that 70% of career development is on the job, 20% is through coaching and mentoring, and 10% is formal training. To that end, GSK invites employees to engage in dialogues with managers and build conversations based on job experiences. “Development is much more than formal training courses,” De Decker said.

Millennials bring bountiful benefits to companies, De Decker added. She said they are broad-thinking, flexible and can work across boundaries, including not only countries, but also function. Rather than driven to climb the proverbial career ladder, they don’t only want to go up. “It isn’t only about the ladder,” De Decker said. “It is about the lattice. Broadening their experience is worth as much as stepping up.”

Their networking acumen — sharpened through social networking — has made millennials more proactive in connecting. “They build a web of connections, they have friends across the world and are at ease with different cultures,” she said. Millennials also help develop business strategies for a digital world.

De Decker coaches future leaders to build their paths in a methodical manner. “I tell them to think two roles ahead and build experience step by step,” De Decker said. “Let each role be a stepping stone for the next move.” She also encourages the next generation to learn a language, which is “almost like having another degree.”

GSK appeals to people with core values that match its mission. Some employees have joined because they witnessed babies die of a vaccine-preventable disease or to help alleviate pain they’ve watched loved ones struggle with, De Decker noted. “Our people help change the world.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?