HEALTH

Pfizer Consumer Healthcare celebrates new Advil product with contest

BY Michael Johnsen

MADISON, N.J. Pfizer Consumer Healthcare on Tuesday announced it will be supporting its Advil Congestion Relief launch with a text-driven sweepstakes across five metropolitan areas, including Atlanta; Grapevine, Texas; Jersey City, N.J.; Orland Park, Ill.; and Pleasanton, Calif. As many as 100 sweepstake winners will be awarded the services of a personal shopper for use on Black Friday, providing “literal congestion relief” on one of the most congested holiday shopping days.

 

One grand prize winner in each city also will win a $1,000 gift card.

 

 

"We know that congestion — either a stuffy nose or a crowded mall — can really put a damper on the busy holiday season," stated Kristin Shea, franchise lead of upper respiratory and allergy at Pfizer Consumer Healthcare. "We’re offering consumers two new solutions this season: new Advil Congestion Relief that tackles the real cause of their congestion — swelling due to nasal inflammation — and personal Black Friday ‘Decongesters’ to provide 100 lucky winners with literal relief from congested malls."

 

 

The personal assistants will help winning shoppers by waiting in long lines for them, running mall errands for them and carrying their heavy shopping bags.

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

FeverAll to be featured on Lifetime

BY Michael Johnsen

MORRISTOWN, N.J. — On Tuesday, Lifetime Television’s program “The Balancing Act” will feature an appearance from Sarita Thapar, director of medical affairs for Actavis, to discuss the benefits of the company’s pediatric suppository FeverAll, Actavis announced last week.

FeverAll offers peace of mind for parents, Thapar said, because the suppository as a delivery system helps to ensure the correct dose of acetaminophen is administered. “Because it is a suppository, there are no worries about a child spitting it out, like with liquid medications,” she said. “As a mom, that’s one less thing to worry about when your little one isn’t feeling well.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

New Rx FSA rule deemed operationally impossible by industry thought leaders

BY DSN STAFF

WASHINGTON — A panel of healthcare thought leaders has concluded that a recent IRS rule change going into effect Jan. 14, 2011, will demand retail system challenges that are operationally impossible to overcome in the limited time frame required.

And the National Association of Chain Drug Stores couldn’t agree more.

The new rule is the requirement of a written prescription to qualify over-the-counter medicines as reimbursable medical expenses through the use of pre-tax flexible spending accounts. Before, a consumer would just have to swipe his or her FSA debit card when making an eligible OTC purchase. Now he or she has to make a doctor’s visit and get a prescription.

“We see this as a threat to consumer access and choice at a time when we need our citizens to be more engaged in managing their health and the cost of care,” stated Jon Comola, executive director of the Foundation for HealthSmart Consumers. According to foundation researchers, the resulting costs could reach $2.5 billion annually if doctor visits and lab tests are incurred by even 10% of the insured population; potential new pharmacy costs could reach $3 billion annually.

NACDS is concerned that current IRS guidance would prohibit the use of debit cards in the purchase of not only any prescribed OTC medicine, but also any prescription-only therapy. “Currently, there is no robust interaction between pharmacy dispensing systems and IIAS systems,” NACDS stated. The Inventory Information Approval System is used to substantiate purchases for flexible spending accounts.

“IIAS systems cannot distinguish between a medication for which a prescription is required and an OTC that has been prescribed,” NACDS explained. “As a result, a prohibition on using debit cards for prescribed OTC medications could have the practical effect of prohibiting the use of debit cards for all prescribed medications.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?