PHARMACY

Pfizer announces Embeda post-market trial results

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK — A Pfizer painkiller appears to produce a much less positive experience for recreational drug users when crushed than when administered whole, according to results of a post-market clinical study program.

The drug maker announced results of three phase-4 trials of Embeda (morphine sulfate and naltrexone hydrochloride) designed to assess its affects when crushed and taken orally or inhaled through the nose. Two of the studies tested Embeda on recreational drug users, while the third study tested it on patients with chronic pain, though that study had to be canceled due to Pfizer’s voluntary recall of Embeda in March 2011 due to a chemical stability issue.

In the studies among recreational users, however, the company said Embeda produced lower scores of "drug liking," "high," "good effects," "overall drug liking" and "take the drug again."


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly DSN Collaborative Care e-newsletter.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
PHARMACY

Actavis, QRxPharma partner to sell MoxDuo IR

BY Alaric DeArment

MORRISTOWN, N.J. — Drug maker Actavis is partnering with QRxPharma to sell what the former called a novel pain drug in the United States.

The company said Wednesday that the two had signed a letter of intent to commercialize MoxDuo IR (morphine and oxycodone), which they plan to launch in third quarter 2012.

"This partnership represents a major step in our strategy to further strengthen our position as on eof the major players in the segment of pain management in the U.S.," Actavis CEO Claudio Albrecht said. "Furthermore, as this latest development highlights, Actavis is serious in its quest to be ahead of the changing generic pharmaceutical industry. In the future, there will not be such a clear difference between innovator and generic companies. The lines between the two models are blurring. The generics business as we know it today will be gone within the next 10 years."


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly Collaborative Care e-newsletter.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
PHARMACY

WAG study: Patient adherence with 90-day Rx at retail as good or better than mail order

BY Michael Johnsen

DEERFIELD, Ill. — Medication adherence is as high or slightly better among patients filling 90-day prescriptions at retail versus mail order, according to a new Walgreens study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Managed Care that the chain highlighted Thursday.

According to the study, adherence levels for 90-day at retail were 77%, while at mail-order adherence levels were 76%.

"Patients who fill maintenance prescriptions at retail have a statistically significantly higher [medication possession ratio] than patients who fill their prescriptions via mail," wrote Nikhil Khandelwal, lead author of the study and Walgreens manager of pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research. MPR represents the percentage of time a patient has access to medication. "The retail setting may present advantages related to quality of care and patient convenience. However, additional studies are needed to better understand factors which may contribute to this result."

“We know that improving patient adherence is critical,” said Jeffrey Kang, Walgreens SVP pharmacy, health and wellness services and solutions. “Given that community pharmacy also provides patients the potential benefit of face-to-face interaction with a pharmacist to help them manage their medications and overall wellness, these findings suggest that a 90-day at retail option in health plans potentially drives better patient outcomes and reduced costs for employers and payers.”

For the study, de-identified pharmacy claims data from a large pharmacy benefit manager were analyzed. Patients were selected if they were continuously eligible for at least 12 months between January 2008 and August 2010, with plan designs that allowed the option of filling 90-day supplies at either retail or mail order. Adherence was measured by medication possessions ratio for nine therapeutic groups (antiasthmatics and bronchodilators, antidepressants, antidiabetics, antihyperlipidemics, antihypertensives, beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, diuretics and thyroid agents).

The full study is available online.


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly Collaborative Care e-newsletter.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?