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Personal gains celebrated with Special K weight-loss campaign

BY Allison Cerra

BATTLE CREEK, Mich. — Kellogg announced a new campaign for its Special K brand, which focuses on emotional gains when achieving weight loss.

The "What Will You Gain When You Lose" campaign will encourage women to rethink their weight-loss resolutions through television, print and online advertising, as well as an interactive event held at New York’s Times Square on Monday.

"It truly is not what the numbers on the scale read, but how you feel about yourself that allows you to project beauty and confidence to the world," said Jesper Lund Jacobsen, associate director of the Special K brand. "That is what the new Special K brand campaign is all about, reminding women of the positive emotional benefits that come from reaching weight-management goals. It’s not what you lose, but what you gain in the process that translates into the real reward."

"With our multidimensional ‘What Will You Gain When You Lose’ campaign, we’re looking to help reshape the mindset of how women approach weight loss in the new year," Jacobsen added.

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Craft beers gain in popularity

BY Drug Store News Report

CHICAGO — According to  consumer research firm Mintel, more beer drinkers are reaching for domestically made craft beers over imported brews.

While just 13% of beer drinkers said they prefer domestic craft or microbrew beers (compared with 43% for domestic and 22% for imported), 59% said they like to try them and 51% would try more craft or microbrew beers if they knew more about them.

"Craft beers have increased in popularity in the past five years and [have] enjoyed a boost in their consumer base," said Garima Goel Lal, senior analyst at Mintel. "Craft beer is most popular with the 25- [to] 34-year-old crowd, so manufacturers would be wise to target this demographic and educate them more about artisan beers."

However, price is a deterrent for some drinkers when it comes to trying or purchasing craft beers; 41% of drinkers only enjoy craft/microbrew beers as a treat because they are expensive. Meanwhile, 29% reported drinking less craft beer than they did a year ago because of the price. But the market still shows resilience, as 29% of consumers who reported drinking more beer than they did a year ago said they are drinking more craft/microbrew beer as an affordable luxury.

"The recession hit many industries hard, and the beer market was no exception," Lal noted. "The good news is, it appears that the influence of the recession is becoming less pronounced on the beer market in terms of losing volume. The number of beer drinkers who are drinking less beer has decreased since 2009."

Also worth noting in the research:

  • 63% of beer drinkers prefer their beer in a bottle;
  • 20% prefer to drink their beer from a can;
  • 8% prefer draft beer served from a large container (e.g., a growler); and
  • Just 2% prefer a keg.

 

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Tops Markets partners with dietary/diabetes educator to debut Savings for Health

BY DSN STAFF

BUFFALO, N.Y. — Tops Markets, which operates 132 stores in western New York and Pennsylvania, is offering customers a new service to help them make healthier eating choices and develop better habits, according to a report by The Buffalo News.

Offered in partnership with Southtowns, N.Y.-based dietary and diabetes education consultant Propel Health, the program, called “Savings for Health,” offers enrollees access to information on food and menu-planning options based on products that currently are available in local Tops stores. The program costs $19.95 per year to join.

The goal of Savings for Health is to reinforce the message that eating healthy foods doesn’t have to break the bank. "Healthy eating does not have to be more expensive. That’s a misconception," registered dietitian, certified diabetes educator and Propel Health owner Jeff Ensminger told The Buffalo News. "[Savings for Health is] geared toward preventing chronic diseases, but treating them as well."

Once enrolled, users access a password-protected website at SavingsForHealth.com to receive weekly updates on available health food items and products, as well as recipes, meal-planning tips, weekly coupons and the weekly healthy shopping list, which also is e-mailed to enrollees. All foods, recipes and meal recommendations on the site meet or exceed American Medical Association, American Heart Association, American Diabetes Association, American Cancer Society and American Dietetic Association dietary guidelines.

According to a Tops Markets spokeswoman, the chain’s Buffalo-area stores will be the first to try out the new program, which is expected to be rolled out to the retailer’s stores in other markets, the newspaper noted.

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