HEALTH

Pedometers and positive intervention produce tangible results in RA community

BY Michael Johnsen

SAN FRANCISCO — Using a pedometer to measure the number of steps one takes in a day has been linked to lower fatigue in persons with rheumatoid arthritis, according to research presented last week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Meeting in San Francisco.
 
Fatigue is a problem for many people with RA, and this can often lead to them shying away from physical activity, which unfortunately contributes to a cycle of more fatigue and less physical activity. Researchers from the University of California in San Francisco recently looked at one way of breaking this cycle – the use of pedometers.
 
“With prior funding from the Rheumatology Research Foundation, I completed a study of the predictors of fatigue in RA. We found that, even after accounting for RA disease activity, obesity, depression and sleep disturbance were important predictors of RA fatigue, and that physical inactivity was associated with each of those predictors. So, physical inactivity seemed to be the most important target to address,” explained lead investigator, Patricia Katz, professor of medicine and health policy; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco.
 
Katz’s team recruited 96 people from previous studies and rheumatology clinics to participate in a study — also funded by the Rheumatology Research Foundation — that looked at the effects of increased daily activity on RA-related fatigue. To participate in the study, a person had to be English or Spanish speaking, able to walk (even with a walking aid), able to return for follow up visits, experience at least a moderate level of fatigue and be sedentary. Of the 96 participants, 88% were women with an average age of 54 and who had been diagnosed with RA an average of 14 years. The majority were English speaking; and 59% and 60% were on glucocorticoids and biologics, respectively.
 
Each of the participants was randomly placed into one of three groups. The first group received education on physical activity and no other intervention. Group two received a pedometer and a diary to log their daily steps. Group three received a pedometer, step diary, and a goal of increasing their steps by 10 percent every two weeks.
 
Groups two and three received calls from study personnel every two weeks to check on progress and collect the number of steps walked. Additionally, during these calls, group three would receive their new step goal for the next two weeks. All of the groups received a follow-up call at 10 weeks and participated in an in-person follow up at 21 weeks.
 
At 21 weeks, groups two and three had significant increases in their daily steps when compared to group one (which had virtually no change in activity). Group two increased their steps by 87%, and group three by 159%. “Just having a pedometer and reporting steps seemed to be important,” Katz said. “Combined, both pedometer groups increased average daily steps by 125%, and both had significant decreases in fatigue. Of course, having goals seemed to create an even greater increase in steps and decrease in fatigue, but the important shift occurred just from having the pedometer and monitoring steps.” 
 
While all groups noted their fatigue decreased the more they moved, it was the participants who were the least active at the beginning of the study who noticed the biggest change in fatigue at the end, suggesting that people who were the least active gained the most from the intervention.
 
“From a purely logistical point of view, if someone’s baseline activity level is 2,000 steps per day, it may be less difficult in terms of time and effort for them to increase their steps per day by 100% to 4,000 steps per day over a five-month period,” Katz said. “This may also move them from being very sedentary to a healthier level of activity. On the other hand, if someone is already covering 5,000 steps per day, it will take more time during the day for them to increase by 100%. And, while this increase is likely to have health benefits, the change in health benefits may not be as great when compared to someone moving from sedentary to low activity," she said. 
 
“Overall, this study further confirms the importance of physical activity for people with RA,” Katz concluded. “Not only does it help to reduce fatigue — as shown in this study — it may improve mood, help a patient maintain a healthy weight, improve cardiovascular risk factors and improve overall functioning.”
 
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Survey: Bladder health concerns impact 13 million U.S. women

BY Michael Johnsen

CINCINNATI — Nearly 13 million American women with sensitive bladders say their bladder leaks make them feel about nine years older than they actually are, according to a new IPSOS survey from Procter & Gamble’s Always Discreet.
 
For National Bladder Health Awareness Month, Always Discreet is on a mission to educate women about this health topic, normalize the conversation and help women feel protected and more confident. 
 
“With age comes wisdom and experience, but it can also include new and unexpected signs of growing older that can impact your body and life,” stated Barbara Hannah Grufferman, positive aging expert and author of "The Best of Everything After 50." “National Bladder Health Awareness Month is a great time for women of all ages to assess their needs and learn how to manage their sensitive bladders.”
 
As many as one in three women with sensitive bladders do not use any protection products. But for most women with sensitive bladders (72%) who do use bladder protection say they feel more confident because of these products. 
 
The survey also found that a third of women with sensitive bladders (33%) admit they lack the confidence to wear the clothes they want and that they tend to wear dark colored clothing or loose clothing on their bottom half and 26% of women with sensitive bladders admit their condition impacts their happiness.
 
The Always Discreet survey shows that most women with sensitive bladders (74%) have not spoken to a health professional about experiencing leaks. Always Discreet recommends that women keep a diary to help the doctor uncover any patterns as women seek the care they deserve.
 
“By teaming up with Always Discreet, I want to ensure all women have the confidence to talk to their health care professionals about their bladder health, and are inspired to feel youthful and energized about life, no matter what changes happen to their bodies, and this starts by using the right protection,” Grufferman said. 
 
The survey was conducted using the IPSOS Panel that surveyed 400 American Women between the ages of 35 to 65 years old, including one group of 200 women who have experienced any urine loss/bladder weakness in the past three months and one group of 200 women who had not experienced bladder weakness. 
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Sahale Snacks introduces 4 new layered nut bar flavors

BY Michael Johnsen

ORRVILLE, Ohio — Sahale Snacks, makers of nut blends and mixes, is introducing four new flavors across its line of layered nut bars. 
 
“Sahale Snacks offers innovative nut and fruit mix ingredient combinations that make every snacking experience a moment to savor,” Maribeth Burns, VP corporate communications of the J.M. Smucker Company said. “We're delighted to have Sahale Snacks as part of The J.M. Smucker Company family of brands and to introduce unique offerings like the new layered nut bars.”
 
Sahale Snacks’ layered nut bars are Non-GMO Project Verified and contain no artificial colors, flavors or preservatives. Each bar provides 5 to 7 g. of protein. The four new flavor combinations include dark chocolate peanut, salted caramel apple pecan, almond vanilla latte and cinnamon pecan. 
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