BEAUTY CARE

One to watch: more exec changes at 99 Cents Only

BY DSN STAFF

An ongoing senior leadership transformation at 99 Cents Only stores has put a former Kmart executive in the role of interim CEO and now the company has named a former Walmart executive as interim CFO for the second time.

Less than a month after Andy Giancamilli was named interim president and CEO, 99 Cents only named Michael Fung to the role of CFO. Both men served on the company’s board of directors with Giancamilli in the role as chairman.

Fung previously filled the interim CFO role from January to September 2013 and he joined the 99 Cents Only board in December 2013. He fills a position vacated by Bradley Lukow who resigned as CFO of the $1.9 billion company. Fung is highly qualified for top finance role at the operator of 384 stores in four states having spent a decade in senior finance roles at Walmart, including serving as CFO of Walmart’s U.S. operations from 2006 until 2012.

Prior to that Fung served as CFO at Sensient Technologies, Vanstar and Bass Pro Shops. The resignation of Lukow and Fung’s second stint as interim CFO follows the May 26 resignation of Stephane Gonthier from his position as CEO and the appointment of Giancamilli as interim CEO.

At the time, 99 Cents Only indicated in a press release that Gonthier’s resignation after less than two years as the company’s top executive did not involve a disagreement with the company or any matters relating to operations, policies or practices.

Gonthier joined 99 Cents Only in August 2013 after spending six years at Dollarama as president of Canada’s leading dollar store chain. Gonthier entered into an agreement with 99 Cents Only to serve as a consultant to the company for one year.

Giancamilli also has an agreement concerning his interim role with an initial term of 180 days with automatic 30 day renewals until such times as the company hires a permanent CEO or Giancamelli or the company decides not to extend the agreement. Giancamilli has spent the past three years on the 99 Cents Only board and is a veteran retailer well known in the industry. He spent eight years as president and CEO of leading Canadian drug store operation the Katz Group.

Prior to that he was with Canadian Tire Corporation and also served as president and COO of Kmart. He also held senior leadership positions at the now defunct Perry Drug Stores chain.

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Federal bill aims to ban cosmetics testing on animals

BY Antoinette Alexander

WASHINGTON — Animal testing of cosmetic products and ingredients, and the sale of newly animal-tested cosmetics, would be phased out under legislation introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Passage of the Humane Cosmetics Act will bring the United States in line with more than 30 other countries that have already implemented similar bans. The bipartisan bill was introduced by U.S. Reps. Martha McSally, R-Ariz., Don Beyer, D-Va., Joe Heck, R-Nev., and Tony Cárdenas, D-Calif.

U.S. law does not require animal testing for cosmetics, but it does not prohibit it either. With the introduction of legislation in Canada last week, and now the United States, North America is poised to be the next marketplace to end cruelty for cosmetics.  

"Subjecting animals to painful and inhumane testing is not who we are as a country. There's no reason to continue this cruel practice when we have cost-effective alternatives that can bring about safe products for consumers. As an animal lover and volunteer, I'm pleased to be introducing this legislation with my colleagues to take a stand against the inhumane treatment of animals,” stated McSally.

Beyer added, "It is time for us to end the painful and completely unnecessary process of testing American cosmetics on animals. Safer, more cost effective, and completely humane alternatives already exist, and the United States is in no danger of losing its role as a competitive leader in the global cosmetics industry. Now we need to ensure our place as a moral leader.”

An HSUS and Humane Society Legislative Fund poll conducted in 2013 found 73% of American voters are in favor of federal legislation to end animal testing for cosmetics.

"Given the ready availability of alternatives, there is no compelling reason to continue using outdated animal testing methods that cause tremendous animal suffering. So many companies are already using non-animal tests for shampoos, makeups and other products sold around the world, and the United States can help accelerate that trend,” stated Wayne Pacelle, president and CEO of The Humane Society of the United States.

The bill is endorsed by The HSUS and HSLF spearheading the #BeCrueltyFree campaign in the U.S., and Humane Society International leading the campaign globally.

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Study: More than a third of Americans would rather clean toilets than floss daily

BY Antoinette Alexander

CHICAGO — Do you lie to your dentist about how often you floss your teeth? If so, you’re not alone.

According to a new national survey, more than a quarter (27%) of U.S. adults admit they lie to their dentist about how often they floss their teeth. In addition, more than one-third of Americans (36%) would rather do an unpleasant activity like cleaning the toilet (14%) over daily flossing.

The survey was conducted online in March by Harris Poll on behalf of the American Academy of Periodontology among 2,021 U.S. adults and among the top 10 U.S. markets.

Commonly referred to as gum disease, periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease caused when bacteria in plaque below the gum line lead to swelling, irritation, and possibly receding gums and tooth loss. Periodontal disease has been linked to many chronic diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease, and even cancer. Despite its prevalence, periodontal disease is hardly ever discussed, resulting in a lack of urgency for people to properly care for their gums.

“There’s clearly more work to be done when it comes to educating Americans about the importance of oral hygiene. There are more than 500 bacterial species that can be found in plaque, and brushing alone does not remove the bacteria that live below the gum line,” stated AAP president Joan Otomo-Corgel. “The good news about periodontal disease is, with proper and timely care, it’s treatable and often reversible. If a person is at risk for periodontal disease, a periodontist has the training and expertise to determine the best course of treatment.”

The new survey revealed a list of unpleasant activities Americans would choose over flossing, such as washing a sink full of dirty dishes (18%) or waiting in a long check-out line (14%). Nearly 1-in-10 U.S. adults would rather sit in gridlock traffic for an hour or do their taxes (9% each).

Healthiest mouths by state, region
Interestingly, the survey also revealed some regional distinctions in oral health care. Among the top 10 U.S. markets, Chicagoans are more likely than those in other regions to opt for an hour of gridlock traffic over daily flossing. However, New Yorkers are more likely than those in other metro areas to include flossing in their personal care routine.

Those who live in Atlanta are more likely than those in other top metro regions to be honest with their dentist about their flossing routine. Atlantans also are more likely than those in other top metro regions to tell friends when they have something stuck in their teeth. On the contrary, those who live in Washington D.C. are more likely than those in other top metro regions not to alert a friend of any potentially embarrassing lunch leftovers.

Love the gums you’re with
When it comes to relationships, those with and without partners should take note. Sixty percent of U.S. adults who have a partner say their partner’s oral health (e.g., teeth, gums, breath) has an effect on their intimacy, while more than one-third of Americans say a smile is the first thing they notice when meeting someone they are attracted to. In fact, more than 2-in-5 of those living in Los Angeles, Atlanta and Boston say a smile is the first thing they notice when meeting someone they are attracted to. This is especially true for women.
Take Action

To aid in the prevention of periodontal disease, the AAP recommends brushing at least twice a day, flossing daily and discussing periodontal health with a dental professional.

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