HEALTH

One introduces Vanish Hyperthin condoms

BY Michael Johnsen

BOSTON – One on Thursday announced the launch of Vanish Hyperthin condoms. An advancement in latex technology, Vanish is 35% thinner and made with a softer latex for a more comfortable intimate experience, the company stated.
 
Vanish was developed through a two-year collaborative process with customers, outreach organizations and health professionals. Participants provided feedback about various aspects of the product, from the name to the product itself.
 
"We invite people to work with us to discuss their opinions and concerns about sexual health, and we use that information to make better products," stated Davin Wedel, CEO for One. "Over the past few years, manufacturing technology has made it possible to produce thinner condoms, but customers have told us these products aren't always comfortable because the latex is more rigid and doesn't move well with the body. Vanish was designed to make you feel closer to your partner without compromising comfort or reliability."
 
Consumer response to Vanish has been extremely positive. In a recent survey of regular condom users who were provided samples of the product along with other leading ultra-thin condoms, Vanish was preferred by a margin of 4 to 1. The product topped the survey for thinnest condom, softest latex and most comfortable fit.
 
One Vanish Hyperthin condoms are now available online at select retailers and onecondoms.com.  
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HDMA strengthens government affairs team

BY Michael Johnsen

ARLINGTON, Va. — The Healthcare Distribution Management Association announced Thursday that Gary Riddle has joined the association as VP state government affairs and that it has promoted Kristen Freitas from senior director to VP federal government affairs. 
 
“Gary and Kristen have an extensive knowledge of pharmaceutical industry issues,” said HDMA president and CEO John Gray. “Their combined industry and association experience — along with a proven ability to build relationships with healthcare stakeholders and public officials — are an asset to HDMA and its distributor members.” 
 
In his position, Riddle will lead HDMA’s state government affairs activities, working closely with HDMA’s pharmaceutical distributor members to develop and implement strategies on state legislative and regulatory issues affecting the supply chain. 
 
Most recently, Riddle served as senior state government affairs manager for Eisai, where he directed advocacy efforts in the Greater Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions. He also held government affairs positions at Schering-Plough and the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists. Additionally, Riddle served as a health legislative assistant for Sen. Chuck Robb, D-Va. 
 
He holds an MPA from The George Washington University and a BS in Health Administration from James Madison University. 
 
As HDMA’s senior director of federal government affairs, Freitas has been instrumental in building relationships on Capitol Hill that have contributed to the association’s recent legislative successes, including the passage of the Ensuring Patient Access and Effective Drug Enforcement Act of 2015 (H.R. 471) by the House of Representatives. In her new position, Freitas will continue to lead HDMA’s federal advocacy efforts on Capitol Hill along with managing HDMA’s PAC and other grassroots activities. 
 
Prior to joining HDMA, Freitas worked as manager, government affairs for PacifiCare Health Systems, and before that, for a specialty nursing association as well as the National Association for Chain Drug Stores. Prior to NACDS, she served as a director of outreach for former Rep. Dick Chrysler, R-Mich. 
 
Freitas holds a degree in International Relations from Michigan State University and an MPA from George Mason University.
 
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J&J study finds that over-the-hill is a lot younger than you think

BY Michael Johnsen

ANN ARBOR, Mich. – A study conducted by Johnson & Johnson Health and Wellness Solutions and published in PLOS ONE Wednesday revealed that a "tipping point" in adult health occurs at age 45.5, after which health starts declining at an accelerated rate. After this point, an "avalanche" of increasing health issues leads to a spike in morbidity and healthcare costs.
 
The scientific paper, titled "The Avalanche Hypothesis and Compression of Morbidity: Testing Assumptions through Cohort-Sequential Analysis," tests the Compression of Morbidity model. This model suggests that there is a breakpoint, sometime during the adult lifespan, which separates an initial period of relatively good health from a subsequent period of ever increasing morbidity. This theory had never been empirically tested before. Using sophisticated analysis, the research team, which included Johnson & Johnson Health and Wellness Solutions behavioral scientists, tested a study sample of 55,550 adults enrolled in a healthcare program over a three-year period.
 
Results of the study indicate that in people who produce medical claims annually after age 45.5, their health deteriorates exponentially rather than linearly with age. In addition, the study found that the tipping point for healthcare costs actually occurs six years earlier, at age 39.5 years, when these costs begin to rapidly accelerate. This finding needs further research to provide an insight into this counter-intuitive result.
 
"The 'Avalanche' concept has wide-ranging implications for health and the business of healthcare," said Jennifer Turgiss, VP behavior science and analytics at Johnson & Johnson Health and Wellness Solutions. "This study validates an existing model that suggested that once an initial disease state occurs in older adult life, others follow. Prevention of the first disease remains an important strategy to delay or avoid a 'tipping point' in middle-aged adults. Prevention and health maintenance need to begin early in life, well before the 'avalanche' of health issues and their associated costs begin."
 
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E.MICHAUD says:
May-28-2015 09:28 am

I accept.

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