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Old Spice highlights Red Zone collection with new ‘Smell Better Than Yourself’ campaign

BY Antoinette Alexander

CINCINNATI — Procter & Gamble’s Old Spice brand has announced the launch of its new "Smell Better Than Yourself" advertising campaign, which is centered around the Old Spice Red Zone collection of deodorant, body spray and body wash.

The campaign takes a humorous look at how the scents of Old Spice can turn average guys into the manliest of men. The ads premiered on the brand’s social media channels on Facebook and YouTube, giving Old Spice’s fan base a sneak preview of the first of two new television spots. The first commercial, entitled "Sea Captain," will air during the NFL season opening game on Sept. 8. The second spot, titled "Jet," will air beginning Sept. 17.

"Scent plays a significant role in how guys view themselves and also how others perceive them, and the new ‘Smell Better Than Yourself’ campaign brings this reality to life in an entertaining way," stated Allison Bolyard, Old Spice brand manager. "Old Spice has a variety of different scents that allow a guy to choose the scent that is right for him."

Developed in conjunction with Portland-based advertising agency Wieden+Kennedy, the "Smell Better Than Yourself" campaign features two 30-second and two 15-second television commercials, along with a print campaign that humorously illustrate the dramatic “transformational” powers of Old Spice’s versatile Red Zone scent lineup. The campaign also features two new Old Spice personas, adding to the brand’s cast of characters who have appeared in Old Spice’s advertising throughout the years.

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Report: Ranbaxy to launch generic Lipitor at end of November

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK — Ranbaxy Labs will launch its generic version of the world’s top-selling drug as originally planned, according to published reports.

Citing Japan’s Nikkei daily, Reuters reported that Gurgaon, India-based Ranbaxy would launch a generic version of Pfizer’s cholesterol medication Lipitor (atorvastatin) at the end of November.

Though the November launch had long been anticipated, speculation arose that Ranbaxy would have to sell rights to the drug due to manufacturing problems in India that had led the Food and Drug Administration to ban imports of some of its products from there.

But with the launch back on track, a generic version of Lipitor will be a major prize for Ranbaxy. According to IMS Health, the branded version of the drug had U.S. sales of $7.2 billion last year. Under the Hatch-Waxman Act of 1984, as the first company to win approval of a generic version of Lipitor, Ranbaxy will have the exclusive right to market the generic for 180 days, in direct competition with Pfizer.

Still, the company is expected to face additional competition in the form of an authorized generic marketed by Watson Pharmaceuticals. An authorized generic is the branded drug sold under its generic name at a reduced price, usually through a third-party company, as a way of creating a third front of competition against the actual generic.

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Robert Yates to lead Merck KGaA’s life science division

BY Allison Cerra

DARMSTADT, Germany — Merck KGaA announced that Robert Yates was named president of Merck Millipore, the drug maker’s life science division.

Yates will report to Bernd Reckmann, who leads the company’s chemicals business sector, which includes the Merck Millipore and performance materials division. Millipore was acquired by Merck in July 2010.

Prior to his new role, Yates worked at Roche for 22 years, most recently in Roche’s diagnostics division, where he led the life sciences business in Penzberg, Germany.

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