HEALTH

NoorVitamins hitting mass retail with halal-certified supplements

BY Michael Johnsen

 
 
BELLEROSE, N.Y. – NoorVitamins is looking to make some headway in the dietary suppolement space as a U.S.-based manufacturer of halal vitamins. 
 
Halal supplements have been prepared according to Islamic law, and is free from pork products, alcohol and certain other ingredients. A variety of Islamic groups are involved in Halal certification, with companies who wish their products to carry a Halal label paying fees for inspection and certification.
 
Halal vitamins are highly recommended during Ramadan when Muslims are fasting.
 
NoorVitamins recently introduced three new products, including a multivitamin with a proprietary blend to support energy and immunity, a hair/skin/nails product and an enhanced prenatal vitamin. 
 
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N.J. becomes 9th state to restrict sale of DXM

BY Michael Johnsen

TRENTON, N.J. — New Jersey governor Chris Christie took action Tuesday by signing a bill aimed at prohibiting the sale of medications containing dextromethorphan, a substance found in more than 120 over-the-counter cold medications, to any person under the age of 18 unless they have a prescription. New Jersey is the ninth state to implement a law restricting the sale of DXM-containing products to adults. 
 
“The enactment of similar legislation in states across the country has indicated that limiting teen access to DXM is a proven way to prevent abuse,” stated Scott Melville, president and CEO of the Consumer Healthcare Products Association. “We are confident that this law will further allow parents to prevent abuse among their children, while continuing to ensure access for the millions of adults and families who responsibly use products containing DXM to treat common cough symptoms.”
 
The New Jersey legislation addresses the growing problem of teenagers overusing or abusing dextromethorphan to get high and requires the Department of Health to post a link on its website containing a list of products in which dextromethorphan is an active ingredient. 
 
The new law will take effect on Feb. 1, 2016.
 
According to the 2014 National Institute on Drug Abuse’s annual Monitoring the Future survey, one in 30 teens abuses OTC cough medicine containing DXM to get high. To learn more about the side effects of DXM abuse and obtain access to toolkits, brochures, and other educational materials for parents and community leaders visit StopMedicineAbuse.org.        
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McNeil campaign emphasizes reading OTC labels

BY Michael Johnsen

FORT WASHINGTON, Pa. — A new survey of more than 2,000 U.S. adults found that while the majority of consumers recognize the importance of reading the label of an OTC medicine when using the medicine for the first time, only 20% re-read the label of an OTC medicine they have used before. 
 
While most Americans surveyed report they understand the importance of reading the OTC label, many also report not paying consistent attention to it as a critical tool for the safe and responsible use of OTC medicines. The survey also revealed that 2 out of every 5 consumers consider the directions on the OTC label as just guidelines. 
 
When broken down by age, gender and ethnicity, the survey results point to wide gaps in attitudes over the importance of reading OTC medicine labels. 
 
Key findings from the survey include:
 
  • Women, millennials, African Americans and Hispanics tend to be more careful about OTC use;
  • More women find it very important to read an OTC label (81%) and pay attention to restrictions (74%) than men (62% and 58%, respectively);
  • While all age groups find it important to read the label on OTCs they are taking for the first time, significantly more millennials say it is still important to read the label on OTCs they have taken before (82%), whereas only 54% of older Americans over 70 agree;
  • Almost twice as many African-Americans (60%) and Hispanics (57%) say they think it's very important to read the label on an OTC they've taken before, compared to Caucasians (33%); and
  • African Americans (72%) and Hispanics (66%) are significantly more likely than Caucasians (58%) to pay attention to active ingredients on the OTC label.
As a result of these findings, McNeil Consumer Healthcare has developed the "Every Label, Every Time" initiative to educate consumers about the appropriate use of OTC medicines, and the importance of reading and following all medicine labels. The website www.everylabeleverytime.com includes key findings from the consumer survey that can be shared via social media, as well as simple but important tips for taking OTC medicines safely. 
 
“Whether it is the first time or the twentieth time, it is always important to read and follow the label for all medicines, prescription and OTC. As part of our ongoing commitment to promote safe and responsible OTC use, the ‘Every Label, Every Time’ campaign reinforces the simple tactics for responsible medicine use that we hope every consumer will follow,” stated Rajesh Mishra, VP medical and clinical affairs at McNeil Consumer Healthcare. “The OTC medicine label contains information consumers need to use a medicine safely and responsibly, in addition to working closely with their healthcare professionals for guidance, and we hope this campaign further educates consumers of the importance of reading the label every time they use their medicine.”
 
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