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New dairy-based skin care line that lives in the fridge to hit retail

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK — A new skin care line, aptly named Dairyface, is a line of yogurt-based products that incorporate the nutritional benefits of milk to nourish skin’s cells.

Dairyface, which remains fresh in the refrigerator through a clearly-indicated expiration date, is full of prebiotics and probiotics specifically formulated for topical use on the skin. The products are free of preservatives, additives, synthetics or anything artificial.

Founder Oksana Panasenko, who was born in Central Asia and moved to North America in 2006, consulted with dairy microbiologists and cosmetic chemists to develop the line.

“Dairy is the perfect source of nutrients for every skin type — it’s truly the best-kept beauty secret. We want to remind people that everything they need to feel and look beautiful can be found in nature, their fridge and in the mirror,” stated Oksana, who, as teenager in Central Asia, learned of skin care recipes made with live milk cultures and local herbs from an elderly Turkmen woman.

The Dairyface collection includes five facial refreshers that are designed to be applied like a topical mask treatment, and they are suitable for all skin types. The products includes:

  • Peppermint Crème: Peppermint in a base of probiotic yogurt;

  • Glad Allover: Dried orange peel, orange, chamomile, jasmine and grapefruit oils in a base of probiotic yogurt;

  • Green Tea Magic: Olive, almond, apricot and avocado oils and green tea in a base of probiotic yogurt;

  • Lavender Lovely: Lavender, citrus, olive, jasmine and black currant oils and Mediterranean herbs in a base of probiotic yogurt; and

  • Eye Caramba: Olive and avocado oils and parsley in a base of probiotic yogurt.

Dairyface soon will be available at select retail outlets. Each package contains two single-serving treatments for the suggested retail price of $19.95.

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Color sticks to it

BY Antoinette Alexander

Lip color has its groove back. According to data from SymphonyIRI Group, lipstick sales at food, drug and mass (excluding Walmart) rose about 3% to $70.6 million for the 12 weeks ended Sept. 4.


This comes as little surprise as, judging by the many makeup looks on fashion runways, it was evident that lipstick was making a comeback. Furthermore, earlier this year, market research firm NPD Group noted that lip color sales were adding to the recovery of makeup, and Karen Grant, VP and senior industry analyst, said, "as the fashion industry increasingly features bold, as well as understated, lip statements on the runway and in advertisements, lip color appears to be getting its groove back.”

 

 

The article above is part of the DSN Category Review Series. For the complete Fall Cosmetics Sell-Through Report, including extensive charts, data and more analysis, click here.

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Value, demos make up sales in cosmetics

BY Antoinette Alexander

The cosmetics segment has been on the upswing, and the momentum is likely to continue within the mass market as beauty mavens get increasingly thrifty and do their research when it comes to purchasing makeup.


The cosmetics segments for face (up 4%), lips (up 2.7%) and eyes (up 2%) all experienced a lift for the 52 weeks ended Sept. 4 at food, drug and mass (excluding Walmart), according to data from SymphonyIRI Group.


Going forward, it is likely that sales will remain on the upswing as consumers look to get the best value for their money. In fact, a recently released report from Mintel, a supplier of consumer, product and media intelligence, found that 64% of women in the $100,000 to $149,000 income bracket planned to continue buying some store-brand/private-label color cosmetics and some brand-name color cosmetics. This compares with just 50% of women in the $50,000 to $74,000 income bracket, and 48% in the $75,000 to $99,000 income bracket.


In a separate Mintel report, Kat Fay, senior beauty analyst at Mintel, noted, “Women are really starting to do their research when it comes to making cosmetic and skin care purchases. The days where favorite beauty products were simply automatic replacement purchases are gone.”


To further drive sales, retailers and manufacturers shouldn’t underestimate the power of demos. “In addition to recommendations and advertising, shoppers are influenced by in-store cosmetic demos,” Fay said. “Demos show a product in action, teach shoppers how to properly use an item and allow them to ask pertinent questions. Retailers say demos always spur sales.”

 

 

The article above is part of the DSN Category Review Series. For the complete Spring Cosmetics Buy-In Report, including extensive charts, data and more analysis, click here.

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