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Nestle launches Juicy Juice Sparkling

BY Allison Cerra

GLENDALE, Calif. Families looking for the great taste of Juicy Juice and the crisp, refreshing kick found in carbonated beverages can look no further than new Juicy Juice Sparkling from Nestle.

Juicy Juice Sparkling fruit juice beverages contain no added sugar, artificial colors or flavors. The new beverages blend 70% real fruit juice with 30% lightly carbonated water and are an excellent source of vitamin C. Each flavor offers the goodness of real fruit juice and counts as one serving of fruit toward the daily recommended intake.

“Kids love the refreshment of carbonated drinks — especially as they get older, become more independent and see other kids drinking them. However, sodas and other sugar-added drinks can lack the nutritional benefits that kids need, plus they are often loaded with artificial colors and flavors,” said Victoria Nuevo-Celeste, brand manager for Juicy Juice. “Nestle Juicy Juice Sparkling is a great way to provide kids with a fizzy beverage that tastes great and is a nutritious option.”

Juicy Juice Sparkling will be available in stores nationwide at suggested retail prices of $2.68 to $2.99 for the four-bottle multipack, and 99 cents for single-serve cans.

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Cougar Mints are on the (market) prowl

BY Allison Cerra

RIVERSIDE, Ill. A new pheromone-infused breath mint is gearing up to be a top-selling product this summer.

Cougar Mints, a breath mint product geared toward women, contains pheremones to trigger human response from those who smell them, according to Promotionalproducts.org — specializing in trade show giveaways — which is considering the product among its “Summer Hottest Sellers” list.

“These mints have only been available for a couple of months and we can barely keep them in stock,” says Tim Mercer, general manager of Promotionalproducts.org. “Not only are the mints popular, but [many] businesses that are looking for a giveaway at conventions.”

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Consumers become more ‘calorie conscious,’ survey shows

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK Health and weight management are on the minds and plates of consumers nationwide, with 43% of surveyed consumers paying more attention to calorie counts than they were two years ago.

In the new Shopping for Health survey conducted by Harris Interactive on behalf of the Food Marketing Institute and Prevention, a Rodale Inc. magazine, more than 1,423 adult shoppers polled said sodium levels are the new top nutrition label concern (66%), tied with fat (66%) and followed closely by sugar/artificial sweeteners (65%) and calories (60%). Compared with last year, more than one-third of shoppers say they’re buying products with more grains (whole grain, 49%; multigrain, 40%), fiber (39%), low-fat (37%) and low-sodium (34%).

“This research is extremely valuable as supermarkets promote the health and wellness of their customers as a central part of their mission. Most important, it tells us what consumers need to learn about eating healthy foods and how we can best help them as company dietitians teach customers how to improve their diets through store tours, cooking classes and other educational programs,” said Leslie Sarasin, FMI president and CEO.

But while 25% of shoppers said it’s acceptable for the taxation of unhealthy foods, one-third of shoppers are attracted to utilizing grocery list apps and 24% are spending more time in the grocery store than before the economic crash, precision is not necessarily on the minds of consumers, the survey noted:

  • 9% actively count how many calories they consume
  • 50% say they just watch their calories
  • 41% don’t watch at all

“America’s calorie conundrum: more attention does not mean more precision,” said Cary Silvers, Prevention’s director of consumer insights. “While many American’s are paying more attention to calories, they have a long way to go towards knowing how many they consume in an average day. This is the next line of opportunity in calorie management.”

Click here to view or purchase the full report.

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