HEALTH

Nature Made kicks off vitamin-bottle recycling initiative

BY Michael Johnsen

NORTHRIDGE, Calif. Pharmavite on Wednesday announced its new partnership with RecycleBank, a leading green rewards program, in conjunction with the company’s Nature Made vitamin-bottle recycling initiative. The program will reward consumers for their recycling efforts and underscores Nature Made’s commitment to helping consumers feel their best through more complete nutrition, wherever they are in life.

“We are committed to delivering quality products and programs that help enhance our customers’ lives and the communities in which they reside, including providing opportunities to move toward more sustainable lifestyles,” stated Mark Walsh, COO Pharmavite. “RecycleBank has made great strides since their founding in 2005 and we look forward to a very rewarding partnership.”

Nature Made and RecycleBank share a common goal to greatly increase recycling and understand that encouraging consumers to take greener actions is a direct way to benefit the community. Nature Made’s vitamin bottles are made of fully recyclable plastic.

The Nature Made bottle recycling promotion will educate consumers about the recyclability of Nature Made vitamin bottles, while rewarding them with RecycleBank Points for pledging to recycle. Participants in the program will pledge to recycle their vitamin bottles on RecycleBank.com, by entering the 12-digit bottle UPC code. RecycleBank offers an online destination for Nature Made’s health-conscious consumers, to earn points for recycling and redeem them for great rewards, including products and services at hundreds of national and local retailers.

As part of this partnership, Nature Made is working with RecycleBank and the City of Los Angeles to launch the first RecycleBank program in Southern California, which includes several communities throughout the Los Angeles area as well as Northridge, home to Nature Made’s corporate headquarters. Los Angeles and Northridge join the 300 other cities throughout the country that have opted in to participate and reduce the amount of waste and dramatically increase the amount of curbside recycling. Further, Nature Made will participate in a commemorative RecycleBank launch event at LA Live as part of the city’s Earth Day activities.

Currently, RecycleBank services more than one million people across 26 states and also provides service in the United Kingdom.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Vitamin K may reduce risk of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON In the first study of vitamin K and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma risk, researchers at the Mayo Clinic campus in Minnesota have found that people who have higher intakes of vitamin K from their diet have a lower risk of developing non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

 

“These results are provocative, since they are the first work we have done on the connection between vitamin K and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and this is a fairly strong protective effect,” stated the study’s lead investigator, James Cerhan, a cancer epidemiologist. “However, as with all new findings, this will need to be replicated in other studies.”

 

 

Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is a cancer of the immune system and is the most common hematologic malignancy in the United States.

 

Researchers at the Mayo Comprehensive Cancer Center are studying the connection between diet and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma risk, and they became interested in a potential role for vitamin K. While vitamin K is best known for its essential function in several proteins involved in blood clotting (the name of the vitamin is derived from the German word “Koagulations”), it also appears to be important in other biological processes, including inhibition of inflammatory cytokines thought to play a role in non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, as well as pathways involved in cell cycle arrest and cell death.

 

At the 101st Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research, researchers reported that the risk of developing non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma was approximately 45% lower for participants who had vitamin K intakes in the top quartile of intake in the study (more than 108 ug/day), compared to participants who had intakes in the bottom quartile (less than 39 ug/day). This association remained after accounting for other factors such as age, sex, education, obesity, smoking, alcohol use and intake of foods with high amounts of antioxidants.

 

 

The Mayo study enrolled 603 patients who were newly diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma as well as 1,007 matched cancer-free “control” participants. Researchers asked the participants to answer a food questionnaire about their usual intake of over 120 food items two years prior to their cancer diagnosis or enrollment into the study (controls). They also asked about use of a variety of supplements. Vitamin K intake was estimated from this data.

 

 

While there was a clear trend showing that a greater intake of vitamin K from dietary sources was associated with a lower risk of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, the use of vitamin K supplements presented a slightly different picture. Increasing intake of vitamin K from supplements did protect against non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, but reached a point where the highest intake offered no reduction in risk. “The significance of this finding is unclear,” Cerhan said, “but suggests that taking high doses of supplements is unlikely to be helpful.” Cerhan also noted that people taking certain oral anticoagulants or seizure medications should closely follow their physician’s dietary recommendations with respect to vitamin K intake, since vitamin K can interfere with these drugs.

 

 

“Whether the protective effect we observed is due to vitamin K intake, or some other dietary or lifestyle exposure, cannot be definitely assessed in this study,” Cerhan said. “But these findings add to a lot of other data that support a diet that includes plenty of green leafy vegetables in order to prevent many cancers as well as other diseases.”

 

 

The study was funded by the National Cancer Institute.

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

BASF, OrganoBalance to commercialize probiotic to improve oral health

BY Michael Johnsen

FLORHAM PARK, N.J. BASF earlier this month announced plans to commercialize the oral-friendly probiotic pro-t-action in collaboration with OrganoBalance.

“Working closely with OrganoBalance, we have been able to identify the L. paracasei strain that effectively and exclusively binds to the caries bacteria and in doing so improves elimination from the mouth,” stated Markus Pompejus, senior manager BASF Future Business. “The effectiveness of the active ingredients combined with BASF’s ability to offer a product ready for incorporation into everyday oral care products, truly represents new and exciting possibilities in the way of significantly improving oral health.”

Based on probiotic microorganisms, the active ingredient in pro-t-action binds to and eliminates bacteria from the mouth. The Berlin-based OrganoBalance is specialized in microbial strain development and microbiological screening.

Together the companies identified a very particular strain of Lactobacillus paracasei and BASF has since developed a proprietary production process enabling the active ingredient to be easily integrated into everyday consumer products like toothpaste, mouthwash, candies, lozenges and chewing gums used for daily oral care.

Bacteria in the oral cavity, such as Streptococcus mutans, initiate the onset of tooth decay converting the sugar from food into acids. These acids ultimately destroy tooth enamel, reducing essential minerals protecting the teeth and thus lead to lesions or cavities. Shown in testing, the active ingredient, L. paracasei, in pro-t-action has the ability to target the bacteria and bind exclusively to them. The bacteria can then be flushed out of the oral cavity by normal swallowing or rinsing. Needing to remain in the oral cavity for only a minimum of ten seconds to become active, pro-t-action is tasteless, odorless, pH-neutral and helps to maintain the healthy and beneficial microflora in the oral cavity.

Research on L. paracasei for the development of pro-t-action was conducted as a joint effort by OrganoBalance and BASF, in collaboration with the School of Dental Medicine at the University of Connecticut Health Center. The findings of the research, led by Jason Tanzer, University of Connecticut Health Center, and those of Christine Lang, OrganoBalance, was presented before the International Association of Dental Research annual conference held in Miami April 1 to 4.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?