HEALTH

Nature & Health announces voluntary, nationwide recall of five supplement products

BY Michael Johnsen

BREA, Calif. Nature & Health on Wednesday conducted a voluntary nationwide recall of the company’s five supplement products sold under the following names — LibieXtreme, Y-4ever, Libimax X Liquid, Powermania Liquid and Capsule and Herbal Disiac — after being informed by the Food and Drug Administration that lab analyses of these five products found they contained either tadalafil, an active ingredient of an FDA-approved drug for erectile dysfunction; its analog aminotadalafil; or the analog of sidenafil, another active ingredient of an FDA-approved ED drug.

None of the active drug ingredients are listed on the product labels. 

The undeclared ingredients may interact with nitrates found in such prescription drugs as nitroglycerin and may lower blood pressure to dangerous levels. Consumers with diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol or heart disease often take nitrates.

Additionally, the product may cause such side effects as headaches and flushing.

The recalled products were distributed in retail stores in California, Georgia, Illinois, Texas and Ohio.

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Purdue Products unveils reformulated line of laxatives

BY Michael Johnsen

STAMFORD, Conn. Purdue Products recently unveiled its reformulated line of Senokot branded laxatives — the tablets are not chemically processed and the primary ingredient is the deseeded pod of the senna plant.

“We’ve always been proud of the fact that Senokot Tablets are such a trusted laxative brand,” stated Charlene Bailey, director, product management, Purdue Products.  “But we’re really excited to give consumers something new – especially at a time when interest is so high in natural products.” The new Senokot Tablets will be available in pharmacies nationwide in early October. 

Purdue will support the introduction with a comprehensive media plan that includes national television advertising, retail account programs, coupons and rebates.  In addition, the contemporary design for the brand will stand out on-shelf while reinforcing  Senokot as a natural choice for today’s health-minded consumers.

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Study finds physicians, nurses use dietary supplements, recommend them to patients

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON Physicians and nurses are as likely as members of the general public to use dietary supplements and most physicians and nurses recommend supplements to their patients, according to a new study published in Nutrition Journal.

The study, which utilized data from the Council for Responsible Nutrition’s “Life…supplemented” Healthcare Professionals Impact Study, found that 72% of physicians and 89 of nurses used dietary supplements and that 79% of physicians and 82% of nurses said that they recommend dietary supplements to their patients.

“Health professionals including physicians and nurses are just as interested in healthy lifestyles as members of the general public and are just as likely to benefit from rational supplementation,” said lead author Annette Dickinson, consultant and past president of CRN.

The study found that the dietary supplement product most commonly used was the multivitamin, with or without minerals. Vitamins and other minerals most commonly used by both physicians and nurses after multivitamins included vitamin C, a B vitamin complex, vitamin D, vitamin E and calcium. However, physicians and nurses seemed to differ slightly on the non-vitamin and mineral products they used most often — physicians reported higher usages of green tea, fish oil, glucosamine, soy, flax seed and chondroitin (in that order) while nurses tended to use green tea, fish oil, echinacea, glucosamine and flax seed, respectively.

Overall health and wellness is the biggest motivator for taking dietary supplements, according to 40% of physicians and 48% of nurses who take supplements. However, more than two-thirds cited multiple motivations, including bone health, flu or colds, heart health, immune health, joint health, energy and musculoskeletal pain. Most physicians and nurses cite similar reasons for recommending dietary supplements to their patients, with the most common reason being for overall health and wellness (41% of physicians who recommend supplements and 62% of nurses who do). Over three-quarters (75% of physicians and 79% of nurses) also indicated that they would be interested in Continuing Medical Education regarding dietary supplements.

“It may appear surprising that physicians and nurses are as likely as the general population to be using dietary supplements, given the negative views sometimes expressed editorially in medical journals,” Dickinson said. “Physicians and nurses, as well as lay consumers, are exposed to these divergent views and must make their own decisions regarding their personal approach to wellness. The majority opt to use dietary supplements.”

KelloggsDRSNhttp://www.centerstoregrowth.com

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