HEALTH

National Verruca Foundation offers 5 ways to avoid warts this summer

BY Michael Johnsen

CHICAGO — The National Verruca Foundation on Wednesday designated July as Wart Awareness Month in order to raise awareness of warts as summer begins. This month-long observance provides individuals, doctors and community-based organizations an opportunity to address ways to prevent the millions of cases of non-genital warts that appear each year in the United States.
 
Warts can be more than a nuisance; they are highly contagious, embarrassing and can be painful when they appear on pressure points of the body such as the bottom of the feet or on the hands. Plantar (foot) warts affect about 4.5% of the population.
 
Children are at the highest risk of getting non-genital warts with as many as 22% of children contracting them sometime during their childhood. People with weakened or less-mature immune systems are more prone to warts. There is no vaccine for non-genital warts but avoiding them is possible for many people.
 
“With education, many people can avoid the potential pain and embarrassment of warts,” said dermatologist Alan Lasser, executive director of the NVF. “We’re pleased to help increase awareness throughout July, before the peak season begins.”
 
The virus that causes warts is the human papillomavirus (HPV) which is easily transmitted between people and from some objects. The following tips may help you stay wart free:
 
  • Wash hands well and often;Don’t share towels. The wart virus can be transmitted by objects;
  • Wear flip flops or other shoes around public locker rooms, showers and pool decks;
  • Keep skin healthy and free of cuts. Scratches and cuts can make any area of the skin more vulnerable to the wart virus;
  • Cover cuts and scrapes; and
  • Avoid biting nails or picking at hang-nails.
 
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Carma Labs names new VP sales

BY Michael Johnsen

FRANKLIN, Wis. – Carma Laboratories on Wednesday appointed Frank Simone as VP domestic sales. Simone will be responsible for growing the domestic business for all Carmex brands and products, as well as working with brand partners to expand customer relationships with key retailers.
 
Simone has more than 25 years of experience and most recently served as VP sales for Safeway and Alberston’s at Kellogg’s, and prior to that he spent the majority of his career at Pepsi-Cola North America holding various sales leadership and business development/strategic roles across Pepsi-Cola and Gatorade. Simone also served as market VP at Avery Dennison, where he led two business segments for the retail branding and information solutions divisions and managed private label brands for retailer customers like JC Penney and Macy’s, as well as global brands such as Tommy Hilfiger and Hanes.
 
"I am very pleased at the opportunity to join the leadership team at Carma Labs,” Simone said. “In my new role, I will leverage my years of industry experience to build a comprehensive operating plan across multiple channels, act as a strong people leader and decision-maker, and continue to grow market share and maintain strong customer relationships.”
 
Simone holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Food Marketing from St Joseph’s University and a Masters of Business Administration from Loyola College.
 
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Smoking-related health costs down in aggressively anti-tobacco state

BY Michael Johnsen

SAN FRANCISCO — One of the first states to implement a comprehensive tobacco program, California has realized an actual cost decrease of more than 13% for smoking-attributable costs for 2009, according to an article in Nicotine & Tobacco Research published Wednesday.
 
Researchers estimated expenditures for smoking-attributable costs (healthcare, lost productivity from illness and lost productivity from premature mortality) in 2009 came to $18.1 billion, amounting to $487 per California resident and $4,603 per smoker.
 
In two previous studies, conducted in 1989 and 1999, the annual financial impact of smoking on California's economy was tallied at $7.6 billion and $15.8 billion, respectively. Nominally, the figures show a 15% increase in the last decade, but inflation-adjusted totals show a very different picture: the total cost of smoking in 1999 expressed in 2009 constant dollars was $20.8 billion. Real costs have actually decreased by over 13%.
 
"The California tobacco control program has been very effective," stated Wendy Max, the study's lead author. "But there remains work to be done, especially in light of the changing landscape of tobacco products."
 
Many recent changes in smoking behavior are thought to have contributed to the 13% decline. Adult smoking prevalence in California has fallen from 21.6% of adults in 1989, to 18.7% in 1999 and to 13.6% in 2009. In 2010, that number fell again with just 11.9% of the state's adults smoking. 
 
Additionally, among those who continue to smoke, there has been a downward trend in smoking intensity – more smokers fell into the category of "nondaily" smokers, and both nondaily and daily smokers reported smoking fewer cigarettes per day, on average. Population shifts in the state, including a greater proportion of Hispanic and Asian Californians, are also worth noting, as these two population groups both have relatively low smoking prevalence.
 
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