PHARMACY

NACDS, NCPA praise passage of Senate’s ‘jobs’ bill

BY Allison Cerra

ALEXANDRIA, Va. Two organizations representing the drug retailing industry and the nation’s independent pharmacies applauded the passage of H.R. 4213 — the American Workers, State and Business Relief Act of 2010 — introduced by Sens. Harry Reid, D-Nev., and Max Baucus, D-Mont.

The National Association of Chain Drug Stores and the National Community Pharmacists Association lauded H.R. 4213, which is in part designed to extend tax breaks, jobless benefits and highway funds to Americans, in addition to benefit those representing by NACDS and NCPA, that is, it will keep Medicare reimbursement rates at current levels, and includes a six-month extension of the temporary increase in the federal medical assistance percentage.

Said NCPA EVP and CEO Bruce Roberts, “The Senate did the right thing in approving provisions that help ensure Medicare and Medicaid patients’ access to health care is not compromised. These important provisions give seniors more options to obtain valuable medical supplies, like diabetes testing strips, and maintain the ability of our most economically disadvantaged patients to purchase needed prescription drugs. Now it is critical that when House lawmakers consider moving their own ‘jobs’ bill, that these pharmacy and patient-friendly provisions be included.”

Both organizations “urge expedited advancement of this legislation through Congress, to President Obama’s desk, and into law.”

“NACDS commends the Senate for passing legislation that is vital for pharmacy patient care. The NACDS members who are in Washington this week for the NACDS RxIMPACT Day on Capitol Hill will thank Senators for advancing this legislation, and urge its forward progress,” said NACDS president and CEO Steve Anderson.

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PHARMACY

RediClinic offering Latisse consultations

BY Antoinette Alexander

HOUSTON RediClinic, which operates 22 retail health clinics inside select H-E-B stores in the Greater Houston and Austin area, now is offering Latisse, an FDA-approved prescription treatment to grow lashes.

Latisse is a prescription treatment for hypotrichosis used to grow eyelashes. Eyelash hypotrichosis is another name for not having enough eyelashes or eyelashes that are inadequate. The topical solution must be applied each night on the skin of the upper eyelid margins at the base of the eyelashes. Results are gradual and peak after 12 to 16 weeks.

RediClinic is offering Latisse consultations for $69.

 

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t.hopkins says:
Apr-06-2011 11:39 am

Good to know this. Many women would love to consult first before jumping to using Latisse or buy latisse. It is always good to know first if you are okay with anything you are going to take.

t.miller says:
Mar-17-2011 09:04 am

Where exactly can I find this clinic? I want to consult in a very prestigious clinic first before I will purchase and use Latisse. Just want to make sure. Shay Arrellin buy latisse

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Bristol-Myers Squibb, AstraZeneca announce postmarketing study for Onglyza

BY Alaric DeArment

WILMINGTON, Del. Two drug makers hope to find out how well a diabetes drug works in treating patients who run the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases in a post-marketing study announced Tuesday.

Bristol-Myers Squibb and AstraZeneca announced the start of a phase 4 study of 12,000 patients with Type 2 diabetes treated with the drug Onglyza (saxagliptin). The placebo-controlled study, called SAVOR-TIMI 53, will take place over a five-year period and follow patients who have a history of previous cardiovascular problems or multiple risk factors for vascular disease, with the goal of determining whether adding Onglyza to their current standard of care will reduce their risk of cardiovascular death, heart attack or stroke.

The Food and Drug Administration approved Onglyza in July 2009.

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