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Muuna launches new flavor offerings

BY Gisselle Gaitan

Muuna, a company focused on reimagining cottage cheese has announced it would be expanding its product portfolio by adding three new flavor launches. The new additions, black cherry, vanilla and raspberry are being introduced alongside the already released pineapple, peach, blueberry, strawberry, and mango flavors, on the heels of the New York City-based company’s retail expansion.

The line is distributed in more than 80% of the Northeast, where cottage cheese category dollars sales trends outpace those for yogurt and several other dairy products, the company said.

“Backed by extensive research, including a deep-dive into consumer flavor demand in the yogurt category, our in-house R&D team created these new flavors. The debut of Black Cherry and Vanilla mark a first in the cottage cheese category, as consumers previously have only seen these flavors available in yogurt,” Gerard Meyer, CEO of Muuna said. “Cottage cheese continues to gain popularity as it’s listed among 2018’s top food trends; plus, the on-the-go portability of our single-serve cups meets consumer demand for delicious, nutritious snack foods.”

Muuna products contain 15 to 19 grams of protein per 5.3-oz. cup, 9 grams of sugar, and 120 to 130 calories per cup. The snacks also contain real pieces of fruit, no artificial colors, sweeteners or flavors, the company said.

Products from Muuna are available for purchase in retailers such as Walmart, ShopRite, Giant, Stop & Shop among many others. A complete list of locations along with product availability can be found on the company’s website.

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Pure Balance, Walmart give dogs extra nutrition

BY DSN STAFF

Now more than ever, people are playing a close eye to the kind of nutrition that goes into the food of their furry family members. Tools have been created to help owners keep track of their furry companion’s nutrition levels, sleeping habits and health habits and an app-enabled pet door have even been added to the mix. So naturally, it would only make sense that a retailer — specifically, Walmart would find a way to join this very in-demand category.

The private brands team at the Bentonville, Ark.-based retailer partnered with Frontenac, Kan.-based Ainsworth back in 2012 to create a premium brand of pet food called Pure Balance. Both teams worked to design a dog food that contains high protein content and grain-free options that many premium pet store brand foods have.

“Working with animal lovers like Ainsworth, Walmart strives every day to bring its customers high-quality products at an affordable price,” the company said.

The line includes no soy, wheat or corn additives, no artificial colors, no preservatives and no chicken by-products. One of the main ingredients in every bag either real lamb meat or poultry and it contains a blend of omega 6 and three fatty acids good for a healthy coat and skin, the company said.

Pure Balance has seven different dry formulas, a dozen more in wet dog food and can be purchased in all Walmart locations in the nation.

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Top picks from 50 years of ‘As Seen on TV’

BY Debby Garbato

1960s: Offering what appeared to be about 5,000 ways to chop carrots, The Veg-O-Matic was introduced by its inventor Ron Popeil and debuted at the International Housewares Show. Sold almost exclusively through TV, it is believed to be the first product to use the red “As Seen on TV” logo, which is not trademarked. Heralded as an easy solution to slicing and dicing produce, it was known for its catchy phrase, “It slices! It dices!”

1970s: Marketed worldwide, the Smokeless Ashtray aimed to make smoking palatable for all — during a time when smoking was actually permitted in public. It sucked in dirty air through special filters and trapped the particles inside. One ad showed a family in a car with dad explaining how the Smokeless Ashtray “allowed his family to breathe fresher, cleaner air.”

1980s: The era marked the beginning of America’s exercise obsession — or at least its obsession with spending money on equipment. Marketed by Suzanne Somers, the ThighMaster was one of the first products to be advertised through a popular celebrity, who demonstrated the product in various settings to show how easy it was to use. More than 10 million ThighMasters have been sold worldwide.

The 1980s also heralded use of much more elaborately produced, higher-cost ads compared with the simple commercials of the 1960s and 1970s. Many ThighMaster ads included endorsements by doctors and personal trainers. In 2014, Somers was inducted into the Direct Response Marketing Hall of Fame.

1990s: George Foreman is probably just as famous for his knockout punches as he is for seasoning salmon. The George Foreman Grill is a small, compact kitchen appliance that presses food between two grilling plates. It is ideal for preparing burgers, grilled cheese sandwiches and chicken breasts. Ads used first person testimonials and demos that imitated an actual cooking program — the “George Foreman Grilling Show”.

2000s: Contradicting the low-fat benefits of the George Forman Grill, the Perfect Bacon Bowl makes edible bowls out of cooked bacon. It was one of several “As Seen on TV” products that capitalized on the trendiness of this crunchy breakfast meat.

The 2000s brought infomercials to yet another level of sophistication with actors, fancy graphics, theme songs and a direct connection to social media and the product’s website.

Source: Carol Wright Gifts. For more comprehensive product information, visit: www.carolwrightgifts.com/blogs/as-seen-on-tv-products-from-last-50-years.cfm.

 

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