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Move the ball back

BY Dave Wendland

During the first several National Football League preseason games this year, the league tried something new for the point after touchdowns. For those of you who may not have noticed — or otherwise don't much care about football — the standard length of the extra point kick following a touchdown has historically produced 20-yard attempts. This preseason, the NFL pushed the distance back to make them 38-yard kicks. Why? It increases the degree of difficulty and adds more nail-biting — and interest — for the fans. Quite frankly, these rather anticlimactic kicks had become hum-drum with more than 99% success.
 
What does this have to do with consumer health care at retail, Dave? Let me explain.
 
First, successful retailers are credited with being innovative. And I think innovation means stretching beyond traditional boundaries. One example is occurring to our north with Shoppers Drug Mart experimenting with fresh produce, meat and expanded dairy. Although U.S. operators (Walgreens and CVS/Caremark) have been edging in this direction, the move for Shoppers is quite bold for Canadians who are not accustomed to the concept.
 
Second, complacency is never an option. Consumers and associates will get bored if the store remains stagnant. Reinventing the shopping experience, introducing new categories and offering innovative services is what sets retailers apart. Abercrombie & Fitch is a pretty good example. What has happened to their tired business proposition? Unfortunately for this retailer, it alienated customers to the point where the clothier has decided keeping their store name on merchandise is a detriment to its survival.
 
Third, relevance. Face it; customers are changing. Without a solid technology platform and focus on convenience, retailers are subject to being overlooked. Our local submarine sandwich shop, Cousins, now offers order-by-mobile or by-web for in-store pick-up. Who ever thought that a sub sandwich took too long to order in-store or through the drive-thru? The idea is to remain relevant to the on-to-go customer.
 
For those retailers that no longer challenge themselves by reinventing the customer experience or change the stakes for shoppers, they run the risk of shopper boredom. It’s time to move the ball back and create a more exciting environment that keeps shoppers interested in returning time and time again.
 

Hamacher Resource Group VP Dave Wendland, a 20-plus year retail industry veteran, is a popular presenter and discussion facilitator available to speak at corporate and association events on a variety of retail-related topics. HRG is a research, marketing and category management firm specializing in consumer health care at retail. Product manufacturers, healthcare distributors, retailers, technology partners and others rely on HRG for strategic and creative solutions to help build their business. Learn more at www.hamacher.com.

 

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Dove launches ‘Silky Hair Dare’

BY Antoinette Alexander

ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS, N.J. — To promote its Dove Pure Care Dry Oil, Unilever’s Dove brand has launched the “Silky Hair Dare” campaign and sweepstakes.

On Monday, CBS's Daytime Emmy Award-nominated talk show “The Talk” will feature Dove celebrity stylist, Mark Townsend, who will give two audience members silky hair transformations using Dove Pure Care Dry Oil.
 
In addition, Dove Hair is daring women everywhere to try Dove Pure Care Dry Oil risk free now through Dec. 31. Take the Dove Silky Hair Dare and share your results at #SilkyHairDareSweeps for a chance to win $20,000 in prizes. Consumers can enter the Dove Silky Hair Dare Sweepstakes, which is open now through Nov. 20. 

Infused with African Macadamia Oil and Coconut Oil, Dove Pure Care Dry Oil system features a lightweight formula that penetrates the hair, leaving no greasiness or undesired product build-up. 

"Women often fear the word oil because they are afraid of it weighing their hair down. However, oils offer hair a myriad of benefits including nourishment, shine, smoothness and protection. Using a system like Dove Pure Care Dry Oil is the perfect solution for women who need delicate, weightless nourishment to restore silky shine to hair that has become dry or dull," Townsend said. 

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Report: 700 follow-on biologics therapies currently moving through pipelines worldwide

BY Michael Johnsen

PHILADEPHIA – According to a report released Monday by Thomson Reuters BioWorld, there are currently 700 follow-on biologics therapies moving through pipelines with many already approved, with 245 biopharma companies and institutes developing or already marketing follow-on biologics in markets throughout the world. Biosimilars are expected to account for approximately one-quarter of the $100 billion worth of sales stemming from off-patent biologics by the end of the decade.
 
South Korea is a notable standout in the race for global leadership in this space and India anticipates biosimilars becoming the most important economic and therapeutic component of its biopharma industry, Thomson Reuters stated.
 
The study provides a comprehensive view of this emerging market with a listing of approved biosimilars, company and deal terms for more than 100 alliances, and an examination of global markets.
 
Key highlights from the report include:
 
  • Big pharma and generics makers face a steep learning curve. While generic makers currently lead the pack, the expertise in this market is held by the biologics makers. New pure-play biosimilar makers funded by governments and private investors also have a strong presence in this arena;
  • Biosimilars promise to deliver big savings. Typically offering 20% to 30% discounts from innovator biologics, biosimilars are expected to deliver $11 billion to $33 billion in savings across the European Union by 2020;
  • Start-ups working to make and sell biosimilars in emerging territories could be the "David" ticket to beat pharma "Goliaths" that dominate those realms;
  • Slow market uptake of biosimilars in the European Union may not also hold true for the United States. Unlike most of the European Union, the United States will allow interchangeability, which is expected to speed adoption and lead to lower prices;
  • The World Health Organization recently proposed a voluntary, global naming scheme that could level the playing field for biosimilars and their reference biologics; and
  • In many parts of the world, follow-ons offer new hope to patients who previously did not have access to pricey biologics, bringing the power of biologics for the first time to markets in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe and Latin America.
"Rather than forgo the benefits of biologics, governments and payers are counting on biosimilars to dramatically change drug development and patient costs by reducing the price tag of important biologics and increasing access to life-saving drugs," said Jon Brett-Harris, managing director of Thomson Reuters Life Sciences. "For this to happen, biosimilars must deliver the power of the reference drugs at a price developing countries can afford and gain the confidence of the marketplace. They have to create their own market."
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