CENTER STORE

Mott’s Medleys provides fruits, vegetables in each serving

BY Allison Cerra

PLANO, Texas In an effort to promote children’s health, Mott’s is launching a new juice drink especially for kids.

Mott’s Medleys juice provides two total servings of fruit and veggies in every 8-ounce glass. The juice brand is teaming up with actress Marcia Cross and nonprofit program KaBOOM! — which underscores the importance of children’s exercise — to promote children’s nutrition and wellness.

“The mission behind Mott’s Medleys and its partnership with KaBOOM! is to make nutritional and physical wellness easier and more fun,” said Allison Methvin, director of marketing for Mott’s. “We are pleased to have the support and advocacy of Marcia Cross as we work with KaBOOM! to take these important steps toward improving the health of families across America.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
CENTER STORE

‘Ridiculously long-lasting gum’ may spell success for confectioners

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK Advertisements for gum boasting long-lasting flavor may yield big bucks for its makers.

Although it was recently acquired by Kraft Foods, Cadbury — whose gum brands include Stride, Trident and Dentyne —  held 33% of the company’s revenue in 2009, and increased 2%, which the company contributed to the U.S. launch of Trident Layers in the second half, “[re-establishing] strong growth momentum in the category.”

But its Cadbury’s Stride brand that really has made waves. Introduced five years ago, the brand now is known for its marketing campaign — featuring such quips as menacing ostriches, secret agents and more, looking for gum patrons to spit out their old yet flavorful piece of gum. The threatening and hilarious message, “Start chewing that new piece of Stride gum… or we’ll find you,” has garnered some attention from specific chewers: teens, college kids and gamers, which could boost its sales. Additionally, the introduction of new Stride Shift, in which the gum flavors change, speak to younger generations looking for fun. The two new flavors include berry-to-mint and citrus-to-mint and now are available at sotres nationwide.

“Stride speaks to younger consumers who chew gum not for functional reasons but for emotional reasons,” Gary Osifchin, director of marketing at Stride, told The New York Times. “Younger consumers have a disdain for the ordinary, and they like to be snapped out of boredom.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
CENTER STORE

Eating nuts may lower cholesterol levels, study finds

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK A pooled analysis of 25 trials found that nut consumption may improve blood cholesterol levels.

The findings — which were published in the May 10 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine — noted that nuts contain plant proteins, fats (especially unsaturated fatty acids), dietary fiber, minerals, vitamins and other such compounds as antioxidants and phytoesterols.

Joan Sabate, M.D., Dr.P.H., of Loma Linda University in California, and colleagues pooled primary data from 25 nut consumption trials conducted in seven countries and involving 583 women and men with high cholesterol or normal cholesterol levels. All the studies compared a control group with a group assigned to consume nuts; participants were not taking lipid-lowering medications.

Participants in the trials consumed an average of 67 grams (about 2.4 oz.) of nuts per day. This was associated with an average 5.1% reduction in total cholesterol concentration, a 7.4% reduction in low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or “bad” cholesterol) and an 8.3% change in ratio of LDL cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein (HDL, or “good” cholesterol). In addition, triglyceride levels declined by 10.2% among individuals with high triglyceride levels (at least 150 milligrams per deciliter), although not among those with lower levels.

“Nuts are a whole food that have been consumed by humans throughout history,” the authors wrote. “Increasing the consumption of nuts as part of an otherwise prudent diet can be expected to favorably affect blood lipid levels (at least in the short term) and have the potential to lower coronary heart disease risk,” noting that different types of nuts had similar effects on blood lipid levels.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?