BEAUTY CARE

Mintel: Moms, young women show highest usage of at-home nail care

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK — Moms and young women helped fuel sales of at-home nail care products, according to the latest research by Mintel.

Women in households with children are more likely to use most nail care products than those without children in their homes, according to the latest research by Mintel. This is particularly notable with nail art accessories where 24% of women with children report usage compared with 11% in households without children.

Moms are an important consumer group that might be tight on time and lack the extra income to spend at a spa but are still looking to treat themselves to some fashion-forward beauty. Furthermore, 79% of those with children use colored nail polish versus 65% without children, and 22% of respondents with children report using artificial nails as opposed to 9% without children, the study found.

“The beauty industry generally benefits when consumers have higher levels of disposable income; however, the nail care industry has experienced strong growth in recent years, despite the weak economy,” stated Shannon Romanowski, beauty and personal care analyst at Mintel. “Nail polish offers women an affordable way to experiment with new colors and stay current with fashion trends, often for less than $10 a bottle. The affordability of nail polish, combined with new products and colors, makes nail care a reasonable splurge for lower- to middle-income women.”


Young women also are helping to drive the nail care segment. Use of colored nail polish is highest among women ages 18 years to 24 years, with 85% reporting usage compared with 71% of total female respondents. Younger women also show elevated use of nail art (33% versus 16% of all respondents), artificial nails (23% versus 14% of all respondents), and gel nail polish (14% versus 10% of all respondents).

“Nail care users younger than 35 years are significantly more likely than their older counterparts to view wearing nail polish as a way to express their personality and follow fashion trends. Meanwhile, those between 35 years and 44 years feel that painting their nails is a way to pamper themselves and take a moment of ‘me time’ in their busy schedules,” added Shannon Romanowski.


Expense plays a large role in why women do their nails at home, but it is not the only issue. Just over half (54%) of women say they would get their nails done more often at a salon, but it’s too expensive; however, some 27% are concerned about health and safety issues at salons and 18% think getting their nails done in a salon simply takes too much time.

Nail care also may have a season. Not surprisingly, the sunshine and warmth sees a lot more painted nails as 58% of women say they polish their toenails more and 31% polish their fingernails more in the summer months.

The nail color and care market in the United States grew by 72% since 2007, with sales estimated at $2.5 billion at the end of 2012. Growth is expected to continue through 2017, albeit at a slower pace than previous years, with sales expected to reach just over $4 billion, according to Mintel.

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New phone app aims to reduce women’s health issues related to tampon use

BY Antoinette Alexander

AUSTIN, Texas — AccAssociates, a developer of applications for both iPhone and Android, has created a new phone app, dubbed Tampon Minder, that keeps women informed and in control of their tampon placement.

Leaving tampons in for more than the manufacturer’s recommended duration can cause serious health issues including, in rare cases, death from Toxic Shock Syndrome. While people may think “how could this possibly be a problem,” the company stated that OB/GYNs and emergency room doctors see women in dire circumstances due to tampons left in too long all the time. In fact, the man who created the app, Cesar Jimenez Lithgow, did so after seeing his 24-year-old daughter rushed to the doctor with serious pelvic inflammation. She, like many other busy women, simply forgot to remove her tampon in a timely manner and only realized the problem when she began experiencing pain and discomfort. By this time, the tampon had begun to disintegrate and required a doctor to effectively remove it. It also required her to be monitored for the following 48 hours due to the risk of Toxic Shock Syndrome.

Tampon Minder is an intuitive app that maintains a two-way communication with women while on their menstrual cycle. To use, women start by selecting the number of days their cycle usually lasts. The app will then monitor and interact with them through the duration of their complete cycle ensuring they don’t forget to remove or replace a tampon.

 The Tampon Minder app is available for download and is priced at $2.99.
 

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Marketing white paper: Most women are motivated to buy ‘healthy’

BY Michael Johnsen

SAN FRANCISCO — Three-in-four women today are motivated to be healthy, and most (82%) believe they will suffer negative consequences if they don’t pursue that healthier lifestyle, according to a white paper released by Anthem Worldwide on Tuesday titled, “What Women Really Want From Health And Wellness.” 

“Regardless of age, health and wellness is an important topic for all women,” said Kathy Oneto, VP brand strategy. “The attitude of today’s woman about health and wellness is that they would rather live according to their internal motivations and not to external expectations. The brands that speak to this desire authentically have an opportunity to build lasting connections with generations of women." she said. "Moreover, when it comes to purchase behavior, health and wellness is a factor at the point of decision, and how brands speak to women up to that point influences the choices they make. A full two-thirds of women believe a brand that motivates them to be healthy is important when considering which brands of products to buy.”

The motivating factors behind this healthier movement includes the desire to feel good (87%), be happy or have attained a higher quality of life (86%) or live their best life (83%). The study also examined women’s attitudes toward their expectations around health and wellness and found that most (84%) feel like they are expected to take responsibility for their family, make others happy (72%), eat for health rather than enjoyment (67%), be responsible to the planet (66%) and be thin (61%). 

“Health and wellness is clearly of importance to women of all generations and more important to younger generations than we anticipated,” Oneto said. "While our research demonstrated that there were similarities across these generations with regard to health and wellness definitions, motivations, and expectations, we also identified differences across them — for overall health and wellness and at a category level, generally driven by life stage.”

Oneto suggested that marketers have one of two choices when speaking with these women — speak to each age group and its distinct motivations, or identify a common motivation or need state that crosses generational lines and can appeal to all women. 

 

 

 

 

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