BEAUTY CARE

Milani Hair goes great lengths

BY Antoinette Alexander

LOS ANGELES Actress and former "Deal or No Deal" model Leyla Milani, with a team of hair care professionals, has developed do-it-yourself, clip-in-and-go hair extensions.

Her new venture, Milani Hair, is an "As Seen on TV" hit after its recent nationwide rollout via two-minute spots on cable and network television. In addition, Milani Hair now is available at select Planet Beauty stores in California.

Milani Hair extensions give women of all ages instant length, volume, fullness, and even color and highlights with the snap of a clip — literally. Each set includes seven individual pieces, measuring at roughly 20 in. in length, and the clips are matched to each hair color. The hair is 100% Remy-grade human hair, which means it is long-lasting and heat- and color-friendly.

 

Milani Hair comes in 10 different shades and is priced at about $180 (three payments of $59.99). With the proper care, Milani Hair should last well up to a year, according to the company. Milani Hair can be found online at MilaniHairTV.com.

 

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Plackers supports oral care awareness with Oral Health America partnership

BY Antoinette Alexander

SAN DIEGO Plackers oral care brand has partnered with Oral Health America on the Fall for Smiles program to help promote oral health awareness nationwide.

Fall for Smiles is an annual awareness-building campaign that encourages families to talk about oral health and include regular brushing and flossing in their back-to-school routines. Oral Health America is an independent organization dedicated to eliminating oral disease through access, education and advocacy.

The program kicked off Sept. 1 with the release of the Fall for Smiles public opinion survey, which was commissioned by Oral Health America and sponsored by Plackers and Oral Healthcare Can’t Wait.

Highlights of the survey indicated that parents are looking to schools to help reinforce the importance of oral health and teach children about taking care of their teeth. Roughly 90% of parents responded that taking children to the dentist on a regular basis is extremely or very important, and a majority of parents said that dental appointments are important for getting children ready to go back to school. Nearly 8-in-10 parents stated that children should floss their teeth at least once a day; however, children reported flossing less than their parents thought they should, with just 30% of children saying they floss their teeth once a day or more.

Plackers will participate in the Calling Oral Health Communities to Action event co-hosted by Oral Health America and Dental Trade Alliance at the Rayburn Office Building in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 29. The event honors the 10th anniversary of the Surgeon General’s Report on Oral Health in America.

Plackers also donated dental flossers to reach more than 30,000 children in need through Smiles Across America, a program created by Oral Health America to improve the oral health of elementary school students.

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FDA: Mouth rinse products cannot have ‘prevents gum disease’ claim

BY Antoinette Alexander

SILVER SPRING, Md. The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday issued warning letters to three companies that manufacture and market mouth rinse products with claims that they remove plaque above the gum line or promote healthy gums. According to the FDA, these claims suggested the products are effective in preventing gum disease when no such benefit has been demonstrated.

Warning letters were sent to: Johnson & Johnson (Listerine total care anti-cavity mouthwash), CVS (CVS complete care anti-cavity mouthwash), and Walgreens (Walgreen mouth rinse full action).

These mouth rinse products contain the active ingredient sodium fluoride.

The FDA has determined that sodium fluoride is effective in preventing cavities, but has not found this ingredient to be effective in removing plaque or preventing gum disease.

Under federal law, a company cannot claim its product is effective in treating a disease unless those claims have been reviewed and approved by the FDA in a new drug application or the active ingredient has been generally recognized as safe and effective for these claims in an over-the-counter drug monograph.

The FDA stated that the actions are part of the agency’s effort to curtail an increasing number of Federal Food Drug and Cosmetic Act violations among the makers/marketers of mouthwashes concerning unproven claims of therapeutic benefits.

 

To date, the FDA is unaware of any injuries or adverse health effects related to the use of these mouth rinse products. Consumers who have these products may continue to use the products for cavity prevention without risk of injury but should be aware that the FDA has no data to show that these products can prevent gum disease.

 

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