CENTER STORE

Michael Season’s releases fat-free, all-natural reduced cheese puffs, pops and curls

BY Melissa Valliant

ADDISON, Ill. Many food manufacturers are attempting to find a happy medium between tasty and healthy, and Michael Season’s Feel Good Snacking brand aims for just that—in the form of cheese curls, no less.

Michael Season’s two new flavors of baked cheese puffs, baked white cheddar cheese pops and baked hot chili pepper cheese curls, are now available nationwide.

Both products contain completely all-natural products and have absolutely no additives, MSG, artificial coloring, artificial flavoring, preservatives, hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils, wheat or gluten. Michael Season’s new baked white cheddar cheese pops are made with real white cheddar and, like the baked hot chili pepper cheese curls, contain half the fat of traditional cheese puffs or curls. Both products are priced at $2.59 per 4-ounce bag.

Michael Season’s released lite cheese puffs in July with 65 percent less fat than the original product. The company has also recently redesigned its baked cheese puffs, curls and pops packaging, adding new “mouth-watering” photos and an updated “Feel Good Snacking” logo.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
CENTER STORE

HEB opens first ‘green’ store in Houston market

BY Jenna Duncan

HOUSTON Grocery chain HEB has announced the opening of a new “green” store in the Houston area.

Ground was broken at the HEB Bunker Hill stores at Interstate 10 and Bunker Hill, in the Houston market, on Friday. The company has said that this new location is HEB’s first LEED-certified storefront in the area. The building was crafted using recycled materials and all appliances and hardware installed meet strict energy efficiency standards. Items such as LED light bulbs were used in place of traditional bulbs in places like food freezers. The freezers are also set with devices that trigger the light bulbs only when a customer opens the door.

HEB said that the store was also designed to use 25 percent the amount of water used to run the average HEB store.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
CENTER STORE

Nestle Waters doing the best it can to be environmentally responsible

BY Melissa Valliant

GREENWICH, Conn. Nestle Waters North America is addressing criticism directed toward its packaging, which some say is environmentally wasteful. The company, which produces major bottled water brand Poland Spring, says it has been taking steps to ensure environmental friendliness; it just had never considered it necessary to speak up about its efforts.

Nestle Waters chief executive officer Kim Jeffery remembers when he first heard about Wal-Mart’s environmental initiatives and says he realized he could think of 10 similar things his company had done; it’s just that no one knew about them. For one, Nestle Waters had built LEED-certified (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) factories, as well as worked with vendors to reduce the amount of plastic in its Poland Spring, Deer Park and other spring water brand bottles. It had also worked toward building awareness and new solutions to increase recycling.

In 2007, the company eliminated 15 percent of their bottles’ weight, sparing 65 million pounds of plastic resin and decreasing energy production costs by 10 percent. Jeffery says he has become an “outspoken advocate of comprehensive recycling initiatives,” despite the fact that once the bottles is in the hands of consumers, his ability to get them to a recycling center is limited. Nestle Waters is currently working with the American Beverage Association to establish a model recycling program in Hartford, Conn. to raise recycling rates in the area. If successful, the plan will be expanded to other cities.

The company hopes to reduce its plastic bottles by another 15 percent by 2010, though it believes this last 15 percent is the furthest it can go in reducing weight and plastic resin in its bottles. It also plans on continuing its efforts to cut its transportation, production and water use. “Being environmentally responsible is part of our DNA and has been in the 30 years that I’ve been with the company,” Jeffery said.

“Obviously, protecting the source of our product is important to us. We wouldn’t have a long-term business otherwise.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?