BEAUTY CARE

Men’s hair coloring, shaving sales increase

BY Antoinette Alexander

The beauty segment continues to celebrate the success of several stars, including nail polish, and men’s grooming is no exception. In fact, industry eyes are once again zeroing in on this vibrant category, as sales enjoy an uptick in such segments as men’s hair coloring and grooming/shaving.

According to data provided by SymphonyIRI Group, a Chicago-based market research firm, sales of men’s hair color for the 52 weeks ended Oct. 7 at total U.S. multi-outlets — which covers supermarkets, drug stores, mass market retailers (including Walmart), military commissaries and select club and dollar retail chains — rose nearly 3%.

Taking the top three spots, according to SymphonyIRI Group data, is Just For Men, including the brand’s Just For Men Autostop. Just For Men Autostop aims to simplify the hair coloring process
by combining everything needed into one tube. There is no need to mix any components.

The men’s grooming market, however, is still marginally skewed to men’s shave, and that is further evidenced by the robust growth of the grooming/shaving segment.

According to SymphonyIRI Group data, sales of grooming/shaving scissors for the same 52-week period rose a healthy 14%, fueled in part by strong sales of the Remington Pivot & Flex. Also helping to grow the segment, Gillette unveiled earlier this year its precision styling tool for men with facial hair. Dubbed the Gillette Fusion ProGlide Styler, it combines Braun’s trimming technology with Gillette’s blade technology to master a facial hairstyle with ease.

 

 

The article above is part of the DSN Category Review Series. For the complete Men’s Grooming Buy-In Report, including extensive charts, data and more analysis, click here.

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Made in America: ‘Buy local’ mentality leads to economic patriotism

BY Michael Johnsen

Made in America. To suggest that this marketing message doesn’t resonate with today’s American consumer may come off as sacrilege, especially considering how job creation was a central issue in this month’s presidential election.

But there are two questions marketers of “Made in America” have to ask. First, does this marketing message have staying power?  And second, where does it rank in a consumer’s purchasing decision tree?

The answers? Yes, “Made in America” will still be a differentiator after the economy fully recovers. But that differentiator does not yet outweigh other considerations like quality and cost.

“It’s a different person now shopping ‘Made in the USA,’” noted Dave Schiff, chief creative officer of the ad agency Made Movement. It’s not a guy driving an F250 with a gun rack in the rear window, he said. “It’s a person almost like an organic consumer — an enlightened consumer that realizes there is a lot of good things that happen on the tail-end of a purchase.”

“Made in America,” as a marketing message, may in fact be traveling along that path of products featuring “organic” on their packaging, noted Jay Forbes, president of The Forbes Connection. For 20 years consumers weren’t necessarily willing to pay more for organic, but as that message has penetrated the value-
oriented Walmart shopper, “organic” has become a premium position.
The same may be happening with 
“Made in America.”

Even though “Buy American” resonates extremely well with value-oriented shoppers, today the message is still just a tie-breaker when perceived value — quality and cost — are equal, Forbes said. “That is beginning to change with the severity of the economy,” he said. “People think local, and that mentality is starting to impact ‘Buy American.’”

According to research conducted by Perception Research Services over the summer, the majority of shoppers do take notice of such packaging claims as “Made in the USA” — 3-out-of-4 Americans said they were more likely to buy American because it “helps the economy.”

“There is definitely a sense of ‘economic patriotism’ around the idea of American-made,” suggested Dave Wendland, VP Hamacher Resource Group. But it goes beyond that, Wendland suggested. “Consumers will be willing to pay more for the safety and quality of 
American-made brands,” he said.

That may be the underlying message that will continue to resonate with consumers beyond a struggling economy. “When you go a little deeper and you see what are the kinds of products [American consumers] care about, … it’s about what people ingest — foods, beverages and particularly medications,” Jonathan Asher, EVP of Perception Research Services, told DSN. “Manufacturers aren’t necessarily thinking about it enough: If you make it here, make that clear.”

Click here to see the six companies profiled by DSN that sell on their American-made heritage.

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Made in America: Products made in America

BY Michael Johnsen

DSN profiled six companies that sell on their American-made heritage as part of its "Made in America" report.

GREEN TOYS
MILL VALLEY, Calif. — Green Toys makes a line of classic children’s toys constructed from recycled, food-safe plastic and other environmentally friendly materials. The products not only help fuel the “Made in America” movement, the use of recycled materials helps distinguish the toy manufacturer by reducing fossil fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions.

Green Toys’ customers don’t care as much about the green message as they do the “Made in America” message, noted Laurie Hyman, company co-founder and marketing executive, “because what is being made in the United States implies quality and a
safe product.”

Green Toys manufactures a line of more than 50 toys and tableware targeting primarily preschoolers out of their facility in San Francisco.

ONESOLE SHOES
BOCA RATON, Fla. — Onesole Shoes is not only produced in America, the line of interchangeable shoes was developed by a successful pharmacist — Dominique McClain Barteet.

Onesole Shoes — selected as Best Product Made in America on ABC World News — feature a flat heel or sole that can be personalized with an interchangeable flap. The product also was featured on the second season of ABC’s “Shark Tank,” when fashion guru Daymond John invested $500,000 for a 35% stake in the company Quick Change Artist.

MODE COSMETICS
ALBANY, N.Y. — Mode Cosmetics was co-created by sisters Cristina Samuels and Jennifer Isaac, who grew up immersed in the family cosmetics manufacturing company Zela. The company has created a strong position not only for “Made in the USA,” but also for “Made in NY” with its line of natural cosmetics.

“‘Made in America’ is increasingly on the forefront of consumer purchasing behaviors,” said Samuels. “Consumers firmly believe that American made products are of superior quality and standards.”
Earlier this year, Mode launched its Natural Skin High Performance Hydrating foundation, which is infused with chardonnay and blueberry fruit extracts to help battle fine lines and wrinkles and diminish uneven skin tone.

NICE-PAK
ORANGEBURG, N.Y. — “Made in America” is a powerful marketing message beyond U.S. borders. Costco has been trading on that “Made in America” position against middle-class shoppers in Mexico with great success. According to reports, that “Made in America” label indicates better quality for shoppers south of the border.

And one of the best-selling products there is private-label baby wipes manufactured by Nice-Pak Products under Costco’s Kirkland Signature brand. Those wipes are even outselling Mexican-made wipes that cost less.

Nice-Pak produces more than 125 billion pre-moistened products in the baby, beauty wipes, personal care, hand wipes and household wipes categories.

ANHEUSER-BUSCH
BOCA RATON, Fla. — There isn’t much more American than a cold bottle of suds after a long, hard day at work. And as far as beers go, there isn’t much more American than Anheuser-Busch’s Budweiser, which possesses a 47.7% share of all U.S. beer sales.

The company operates 12 breweries across the United States, and most recently put its American pride on display at Philadelphia’s “Budweiser Made in America” two-day music festival over Labor Day weekend in Philadelphia, which benefits
United Way.

Anheuser-Busch tapped into the more than 10,000 concert goers present to help determine which three beers would be included in the company’s Budweiser Brewmasters’ Project 12. Sampler 12-packs went on sale Oct. 29.

HYLAND’S
LOS ANGELES — While many manufacturers of homeopathic remedies are sourced from such countries as France and Switzerland, Hyland’s is 100% all-American. And it says so on each product.

Hyland’s has a long American heritage, originating as Standard Homeopathic Pharmacy in 1910 with George Hyland serving as the first pharmacist in a downtown Los Angeles location.

In 1995, Standard acquired Luyties Pharmacal, a St. Louis homeopathic firm tracing its lineage to 1853 when its medicines were popular on wagon trains. That purchase made Standard the only remaining American-owned homeopathic company in the United States.

In 1999, with Jay Borneman as CEO and Mark Phillips as COO, the Hyland’s name and its line of branded medicines was placed at the company’s forefront.

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