HEALTH

Medela makes breastfeeding simpler for moms

BY Michael Johnsen

McHENRY, Ill – Medela on Monday announced the launch of the MyMedela app, now available for Android and iPhone, that offers digital breastfeeding support for pregnant, new and experienced mothers. This 24/7 resource provides mothers with robust tracking tools, along with personalized, expert advice on nursing and pumping. It delivers proactive guidance as well as tips that can lead to a positive breastfeeding experience for mother and child.
 
MyMedela offers a confidence assessment to understand mom's strengths and focus on her goals to then deliver customized feedback and support based on mom's answers and other data entries. The new app also provides a problem solver tool for answers to common breastfeeding questions, featuring tips from expert healthcare professionals.
 
In addition, the app can: 
 
  • Track breastfeeding and pumping routines (e.g., time spent, volume and frequency);
  • Record information about baby's growth and daily activities, such as height, weight, sleep and diapers;
  • See snapshots of mom and baby's activities on easy-to-read dashboards; and
  • Receive personalized reminders, alerts and notifications that celebrate accomplishments and help moms manage breastfeeding challenges and goals.
 
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that while 79% of moms initiate breastfeeding, only 41% of moms are breastfeeding exclusively at three months. While breastfeeding is the most natural way to feed a baby, many mothers – even seasoned ones – need assistance and encouragement to ensure the most successful experience for baby and mom. Results from a survey conducted by Medela indicated that 70% of mothers do not meet their breastfeeding goals. New mothers who are worried about their breastfeeding success are more likely to give up.
 
 
 
 
 
keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Study suggests upper limit of systolic blood pressure too high

BY Michael Johnsen

CHICAGO – A recent study found that lowering one type of blood pressure to well below the commonly recommended level also greatly lowered the number of cardiovascular events and deaths among people at least 50 years old with high blood pressure.
 
“When the amount or type of blood pressure medication was adjusted to achieve a systolic blood pressure target of 120 mmHg compared to the higher target of 140 mmHg, cardiovascular events such as heart attack, stroke and heart failure were reduced by almost one-third, and the risk of death by almost one-fourth," stated Lynne Braun, a nurse practitioner in the Rush Heart Center for Women. “That’s important information, because more lives may be saved and more deaths may be prevented if we maintain lower blood pressure in our patients.”
 
Approximately one out of every three adults in the U.S. has high blood pressure and is subsequently at greater risk of heart disease, stroke, kidney failure and other health problems. 
 
“Another thing that was important to note in this study was that it examined a very diverse population. It seems to apply across the board,” Braun said, who was not involved in the study.
 
The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, which sponsored the study, announced some preliminary results on Sept. 11. The findings of the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial, or SPRINT, were so definitive that it was stopped earlier than planned in order to share the results quickly.
 
keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Natural ingredients, rapid relief top of mind

BY Richard Monks

Homeopathic formulas are altering the way consumers view the external analgesics market.

(To view the full Category Review, click here.)

With a growing number of homeopathic products aimed at treating muscle pain, bumps and bruises being added to retailers’ mix, many weekend warriors, aging baby boomers and parents who closely scrutinize the ingredients in the over-the-counter medications they give to their children are choosing these formulas over the external analgesic products that have dominated the category for years.

“Consumers now see there are options with natural active ingredients and options to strong-smelling products,” Boiron USA VP national accounts Gary Wittenberg said. “Additionally, these products give retailers something innovative to offer consumers.”

Providing shoppers with more homeopathic options often can help grow the particular category. TABS Group founder and CEO Kurt Jetta said research by his firm shows that consumers of homeopathic products are eight times more likely to pay a premium if they know a product is all-natural, and seven times more likely to say these products perform better than standard OTC medications.

In recent months, two of homeopathy’s largest players — Boiron and Hyland’s — have extended their lines of arnica-based formulas. For its part, Boiron, which has seen strong growth with its Arnica Gel, added a cream form of the product, while Hyland’s recently rolled out Hyland’s 4 Kids Bumps n’ Bruises with Arnica.

“We’re seeing a shift in more widespread acceptance of homeopathic treatments from consumers and retailers alike,” said Hyland’s VP marketing Thao Le. “Homeopathy has been around for centuries; however, it seems to be experiencing a bit of a renaissance right now as many millennials and young parents are demanding cleaner, natural products.”

Data released in June by Nielsen, she said, shows that sales of arnica-based topical pain relief products increased 14% over the past year.

“This is one of the most exciting times in our company’s history as mainstream consumers and retailers alike are increasingly looking for more natural solutions in the external analgesics category,” Le said. “The future of homeopathy continues to be an area rich with opportunity and growth.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?