HEALTH

Matrixx taps Andrea Pennington for cold, flu awareness campaign

BY Michael Johnsen

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — Matrixx Initiatives on Tuesday announced a partnership with health expert and former medical director for the Discovery Health Channel Andrea Pennington to help educate consumers on ways to keep healthy during cold-and-flu season. Pennington has appeared on numerous television programs, including "The Oprah Winfrey Show," "Today," CNN, "CBS Morning News" and "Fox News."

 

Pennington’s work with Zicam will focus on raising awareness about how consumers can successfully treat their colds and feel better faster. "Most people have no idea how much power they have over their health," Pennington said. "Simple, small lifestyle changes can have a big impact on wellness. Embracing positive lifestyle changes now can help protect people during cold-and-flu season and promote a lifetime of wellness. I look forward to working with Zicam to help people live a healthy lifestyle."

 

 

Through media interviews and online articles at Zicam.com, Pennington will provide practical tips for people looking to defend themselves and their families this cold-and-flu season. Pennington also will offer consumers advice on how to incorporate sensible strategies that encourage wellness throughout the year.

 

 

As part of its campaign to educate consumers about how to get rid of a cold faster, Zicam also has launched a light-hearted online video featuring TV icons from the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s. The Zicam "Mom Squad" features Florence Henderson (“The Brady Bunch”), Meredith Baxter (“Family Ties”) and Estelle Harris (“Seinfeld”), who have joined forces to dispel the myths Americans have long harbored about treating the common cold.

 

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Tomorrow’s senior is today’s joint care supplement user

BY Michael Johnsen

A recent Raymond James Financial commercial, in which the “fastidious librarian Emily Skinner” lives to the “ripe old age of 187” (thanks in part to prudent financial planning), really captures what tomorrow’s senior is going to look like — or at least what he or she will aspire to look like. And judging by the commercial, seniors will look extremely active, playing a ping-pong champ, landing a record-setting bass and setting off on a hang glider into the sunset.

For manufacturers of joint care supplements, this sort of aspirational and active baby boomer will translate into a steady stream of new users. There also will be an increase in interest among the sandwich generation, who soon will become caregivers for their baby boomer parents. “We’re [starting] to see Americans begin to understand preventative care, as well as responsive care,” said Dave Ritterbush, CEO of Joint Juice. “In the case of joint health, traditionally that market has been built by somebody who begins to have knee pain, etc. People now are beginning to understand that you can begin healthy diets and can be taking steps [toward better health] prior to the actual onset of anything.”

Another potential future sales driver of joint care solutions is today’s obese teenagers.

“When you listen to orthopedic specialists present, there is a lot of discussion these days on childhood obesity and overweight adolescence,” noted David Moore, VP consumer sales for Nutramax Labs. The longer time period that excess weight is carried on the body, the more damage is caused to the joints, and at a younger age. “For every pound of weight that you lose, your joint feels as though you lost 5 to 6 pounds,” Moore said. And since proper dieting isn’t working for these teenagers today, they very well may be in the supplement aisle looking for joint care solutions tomorrow.

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Carving a niche in self-test

BY DSN STAFF

SALT LAKE CITY — Identigene last month officially unveiled its Identigene STD test kit, which tests for chlamydia and gonorrhea—two of the more common sexually transmitted diseases—and essentially created a new niche within the growing self-test category.

For the 52 weeks ended Oct. 3, sales of self-test kits—including paternity, drug testing and disease state screening—were up 20.5% to $57.2 million across food, drug and mass (minus Walmart), according to SymphonyIRI Group data.

Often, infected people don’t know they have contracted an STD that can harm them and others. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends yearly testing for people who are sexually active, especially for pregnant women. The agency estimated that more than 1 million Americans between the ages of 14 and 39 years are infected with an STD each year.

Untreated complications from chlamydia and gonorrhea can be severe and may include infertility or sterility. Women may get pelvic inflammatory disease and are five times more likely to contract HIV/AIDS if infected by chlamydia.

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