PHARMACY

Mail-order pharmacy biz may get thwarted by postal service

BY Jim Frederick

WHAT IT MEANS AND WHY IT’S IMPORTANT Community pharmacy never really was able to stop the mail-order juggernaut. Maybe the cash-strapped U.S. postal service will.

(THE NEWS: Plan to cut Saturday postal service draws heat from mail-order pharmacy. For the full story, click here)

The much-discussed plan by the postal service to scrap its Saturday delivery service for the first time in 147 years has pharmacy benefit managers and the people who run their mail-order prescription units fuming. But if the venerable but crippled agency follows through on its plan to curtail delivery service, it could arm neighborhood-based pharmacy retailers with another weapon in their fight to wrest market share away from their mail-driven competitors.

The reason is clear enough: If mail-order pharmacies have to pay more to get medicines to patients on weekends or on Monday morning via FedEx, UPS or other private-sector delivery companies, it will drive up costs for both the PBMs that own the mail centers and for the patients that rely on them. The result could be a gradual shift by some health-plan payers and patients away from mail deliveries of their prescriptions, and back to retail.

It’s no secret the post office is in big trouble. Hammered by e-mail, social media and such overnight delivery companies as FedEx and UPS, the agency is hemorrhaging money, to the tune of as much as $7 billion in 2010. But cutting weekend deliveries will hurt whole sectors of the U.S. economy, opponents of the plan asserted.

It isn’t just mail-order pharmacies that are crying foul. Newspaper publishers, Internet-based and catalog shippers, and other industries also are raising alarms about the higher costs they’ll have to bear to get their products to customers’ homes and businesses on a timely basis.

Prescription drug shippers may have the most compelling argument against the postal agency’s weekday-only proposal, however. It’s crucial that patients get timely delivery of their medicines, and for some homebound patients, there may be limited alternatives for easy access to those meds. Many Americans also like the savings that often go along with what they see as a convenience in getting chronic-care medicines shipped to their homes.

The mail-order pharmacy industry has traded on those advantages for years, reaping huge financial rewards and chewing up a share of the total U.S. prescription market that now easily exceeds 1-in-5 scripts dispensed. But if the post office ends weekend service, the industry’s growth curve could flatten further.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
PHARMACY

Merck gets nod from FDA for Dulera

BY Alaric DeArment

WHITEHOUSE STATION, N.J. The Food and Drug Administration has approved a new drug by Merck for treating asthma in patients ages 12 years and older, Merck said Thursday.

The FDA approved Dulera (mometasone furoate and formoterol fumarate dihydrate), an inhaled, fixed-dose combination asthma treatment.

“Despite the advances made in the treatment of asthma in recent years, many patients may still not be well-controlled on their current therapies,” University of Tennessee Health Science Center medical professor Michael Blaiss said in a statement on behalf of Merck. “Asthma control is an important treatment goal, and Dulera provides a new option for physicians to help manage this chronic condition in appropriate patients.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
PHARMACY

FDA approves Mylan’s version of Procardia XL

BY Alaric DeArment

PITTSBURGH The Food and Drug Administration has approved a generic drug made by Mylan for heart disease, Mylan said Thursday.

Mylan announced the approval of nifedipine extended-release tablets in the 30, 60 and 90 mg strengths. The drug is used to treat hypertension and angina.

The drug is a generic version of Pfizer’s Procardia XL. Branded and generic versions of the drug had sales of around $234 million during the 12-month period ended in March, according to IMS Health.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?