HEALTH

Luna unveils product line with new vitamin D recipe

BY Allison Cerra

BERKELEY, Calif. In response to women’s ever-changing nutritional needs, Luna, the maker of the Whole Nutrition Bar for Women, announced a new Luna bar recipe with added vitamin D to help support women’s calcium absorption and promote more complete bone health.

Coinciding with Luna’s 10th anniversary, the new recipe commemorates a decade of nourishing women from the inside out. LUNA continues to provide women with the taste they love and the nutrition that their bodies crave.

“Luna has always been dedicated to staying current with the latest knowledge around women’s nutrition to ensure that our food continues to deliver on the nutrients women need most,” said Nicole Pemerl, brand manager of Luna. “The new recipe underscores our commitment to women’s nutrition.”

Luna’s new vitamin D recipe hits shelves this summer in all of the Luna flavors that women have come to love, including White Chocolate Macadamia, Lemon Zest and Nutz Over Chocolate. Each bar is 170 to 190 calories each, rich in antioxidants and high in folic acid, calcium and iron.

Luna bars are sold at select retailers, including Target and REI stores nationwide, and online at www.lunabar.com with a suggested retail price of $1.39.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Lundy releases video, recipes for celiac disease patients

BY Allison Cerra

BUFFALO, N.Y. Motivational speaker and specialty cookbook author Lisa A. Lundy has released a new short video and a document with free recipes on her Web site for patients suffering with celiac disease.

Lundy’s cookbook, “The Super Allergy Girl Allergy & Celiac Cookbook – From A Mother Who Knows”, is a gluten-free, casein-free, dairy-free, egg-free, peanut and tree-nut free and other allergen-free resource that is appropriate for both beginners and advanced bakers.

According to a study by the National Center for Health Statistics, the prevalence of reported food allergies has risen 24% among children under the age of 5 years and 19% among children ages 5 to 17 years during the past ten years. Celiac disease, a food related disease often confused with food allergies, is now four times more common today than it was 50 years ago say U.S. researchers. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease in which eating foods containing wheat, barley, rye and other common grains sets off an immune response that can cause damage to the small intestine.

For more information, visit www.TheSuperAllergyCookbook.com.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Probiotics help gastric-bypass patients lose weight more quickly, Stanford study shows

BY Allison Cerra

STANFORD, Calif. New research from the Stanford University School of Medicine and Stanford Hospital & Clinics suggested that the use of a dietary supplement after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery can help obese patients to more quickly lose weight and to avoid deficiency of a critical B vitamin.

In a study published in the July issue of the Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, John Morton, MD, associate professor of surgery at the medical school, showed that patients who take probiotics after the gastric-bypass procedure tend to shed more pounds than those who don’t take the supplements. Probiotics are the so-called “good” bacteria found in yogurt as well as in over-the-counter dietary supplements that help in the digestion of food.

“Surprisingly, the probiotic group attained a significantly greater percent of excess weight loss than that of control group,” said Morton, who wrote the paper with lead author Gavitt Woodard, a third-year medical student, and five other medical students at the Surgery Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation in Stanford’s Department of Surgery. Morton has performed more than 1,000 of these bypasses at Stanford Hospital & Clinics.

The researchers followed 44 patients on whom Morton had performed the procedure from 2006 to 2007. Patients were randomized into either a probiotic or a control group. Both groups received the same bariatric medical care and nutritional counseling, as well as the support of weight-loss study groups. Both groups also were allowed to consume yogurt, a natural source of probiotics. In addition, the probiotic group consumed one pill per day of Puritan’s Pride, a probiotic supplement that is available online and in many stores. Morton has no financial ties to the company that makes the supplement.

The study showed that at three months, the probiotics group registered a 47.6% weight loss, compared with a 38.5% for the control group.

The study also found that levels of vitamin B-12 were higher in the patients taking probiotics — a significant finding because patients often are deficient in B-12 after gastric-bypass surgery. The probiotics group had B-12 levels of 1,214 picograms per milliliter at three months, compared with the control group’s levels of 811 pg/mL.

There was no outside funding for the study.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?