HEALTH

Lotus Light Enterprises introduces U.K. allergy blocker

BY Michael Johnsen

SILVER LAKE, Wis. — Lotus Light Enterprises recently brought over a new approach to combatting allergies from the U.K. in HayMax.

HayMax is an organic, natural nasal balm that acts as a block against pollen, dust or pet allergen, the company stated. Less allergen in the body means less for the body to react against.

HayMax is made from a blend of beeswax and seed oils, to which is added essential oils or aloe vera leaf juice extracts to create three varieties of HayMax, including original, aloe vera and lavender.

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Health products ride baby boom wave

BY Michael Johnsen

Purveyors of health products have been riding the baby boomer wave for some time now, and it doesn’t appear to be cresting any time soon. According to the Population Reference Bureau, the number of Americans ages 65 years old and older is projected to more than double from 46 million today to more than 98 million by 2060, and the 65-and-older age group’s share of the total population will rise to nearly 24% from 15%.

(To view the full Category Review, click here.)

This will create a demand for many age-related over-the-counter remedies, including these best-selling products that are featured.

For example, solutions for incontinence, including Kimberly-Clark’s Poise brand, certainly resonate with seniors. Sales of adult incontinence products as a whole totaled $1.8 billion on 5.7% growth for the 52 weeks ended Dec. 25 across total U.S. multi-outlets, according to IRI, and with good reason. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 43.8% of noninstitutionalized seniors had experienced some form of incontinence.

Quincy Bioscience’s Prevagen is another popular product that promotes memory function and brain health — two issues that weigh heavily on the minds of Americans. According to AARP’s 2015 Survey on Brain Health, three-quarters of adults over the age of 40 are already concerned about a decline in their brain health down the road. While most adults haven’t noticed any change in their mental abilities, one-third of those over the age of 40 are already reporting impairment to their ability to remember things.

Eye care is another age-centric concern that has catapulted an eye-care supplement, such as Bausch + Lomb’s PreserVision, to the top of the sales charts. The major eye diseases among seniors include cataract (20.5 million Americans over the age of 40, according to CDC), diabetic retinopathy (5.3 million adults over the age of 18), glaucoma (2.2 million Americans over the age of 40) and age-related macular degeneration (1.6 million Americans over the age of 50). The prevalence of vision impairment increases rapidly with age, particularly after age 75.

And according to the 2016 CRN Consumer Survey on Dietary Supplements, the oldest population surveyed (adults ages 55 years old and older) maintains the highest percentage of supplement use at 74%. Not only is Pharmavite’s Nature Made line of supplements one of the better-selling brands, it was awarded the 2016 Reader’s Digest Trusted Brand in the supplement category.

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Is ‘fat’ the new normal? Fewer overweight people are dieting, study finds

BY Michael Johnsen

CHICAGO — Although weight gain has continued among U.S. adults, fewer report trying to lose weight, according to a study appearing in the March 7 issue of JAMA.

Socially acceptable body weight is increasing. If more individuals who are overweight or obese are satisfied with their weight, fewer might be motivated to lose unhealthy weight. Jian Zhang, of Georgia Southern University, and colleagues used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to assess the trend in the percentage of adults who were overweight or obese and trying to lose weight during three periods: from 1988-1994, 1999-2004 and 2009-2014.

Participants ages 20 to 59 years who were overweight (a body mass index of 25 to less than 30) or obese (BMI 30 or greater) were included. The question of interest was "During the past 12 months, have you tried to lose weight?"

The study included 27,350 adults. Overweight and obesity prevalence increased throughout the study period, from 53% in 1988-1994 to 66% in 2009-2014. The percentages of adults who were overweight or obese and trying to lose weight declined during the same period, from 56% in 1988-1994 to 49% in 2009-2014.

The fact that fewer adults are trying to lose weight may be due to body weight misperception that reduces the motivation to engage in weight loss efforts, or primary care clinicians not discussing weight issues with patients. Also, the longer adults live with obesity, the less they may be willing to attempt weight loss, in particular if they had attempted weight loss multiple times without success, the authors noted.
 

 

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