BEAUTY CARE

L’Oreal adds two pieces to jewelry collection for ovarian cancer research fund

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK French beauty company L’Oreal Paris is commemorating the 10th anniversary of its partnership with The Ovarian Cancer Research Fund and is adding two new pieces to its Color of Hope Jewelry Collection.

The company is donating all of the net profits ($5 for each sterling silver item and $150 for the diamond bracelet) from the collection to OCRF. September is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month.

The two new pieces designed exclusively for this initiative are a sterling silver Pave Pendant with Chain ($24.95 retail) and sterling silver Pave Earrings ($29.95 retail). They join the signature sterling silver bracelet ($24.95 retail) and the 14k white gold and pave Diamond Bracelet ($795 retail) that was originally created to commemorate the 2006 L’Oreal Legends Gala.

All of the items, which feature an “O”-shaped clasp as a symbol for ovarian cancer, can be purchased online at www.lorealcolorofhope.com and at L’Oreal Paris retail stores.

The multi-pronged Color of Hope initiative also includes a Color of Hope Makeup Collection, which will be available in October; a $1 donation to OCRF for the sale of select skin care products throughout October at participating Wal-Mart stores; a public awareness campaign featuring L’Oreal spokeswomen Andie MacDowell and Milla Jovovich; and an annual fundraiser that will be help this year in Los Angeles on Nov. 7. 

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Fashion Fair names Anne Sempowski Ward president and CEO

BY Antoinette Alexander

CHICAGO Former Procter & Gamble and Coca-Cola executive Anne Sempowski Ward has been named president and chief operating officer of Fashion Fair Cosmetics, a cosmetic and skin care company for women of color.

In Ward’s newly created role, which will be effective Oct. 1, she will lead all aspects of sales, product development, supply chain and marketing. She also will create and oversee all business development strategies and implement initiatives to strengthen brand equity.

Previously, Ward was assistant vice president of African-American marketing for Coca-Cola. In that role, Ward was responsible for implementing all business development strategies and programs to build market share with African-American consumers across all major brands, including Coke, Sprite, Powerade, Dasani and Minute Maid. Before that, Ward spent more than a decade at P&G, where she led several brands and categories, including hair care, Tampax, Always and Pampers.

She is perhaps best known for launching significant African-American marketing strategies and programs within both Fortune 500 companies. She also created the “Total You” beauty platform across P&G’s largest beauty brands. 

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Body Shop founder passes at 64

BY Antoinette Alexander

LONDON The Body Shop founder Anita Roddick, who used her cosmetics company to help communicate human rights and environmental issues, died Monday after suffering a brain hemorrhage. She was 64.

According to published reports, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown led tributes to Roddick on Tuesday, describing her as a “true pioneer.”

Roddick, who died in a hospital in Chichester with her family at her bedside, had revealed in February that she contracted hepatitis C through a blood transfusion while giving birth to a daughter in 1971.

Roddick revealed the news after becoming the patron of a British charity Hepatitis C Trust. While she had been carrying the disease for more than three decades, it wasn’t detected until two years after a blood test.

According to reports, it wasn’t immediately known whether there was a link between the brain hemorrhage and the disease.

Roddick founded The Body Shop in 1976, selling natural-based beauty products. “It wasn’t only economic necessity that inspired the birth of The Body Shop. My early travels had given me a wealth of experience. I had spent time in farming and fishing communities with pre-industrial people, and had been exposed to body rituals of women from all over the world,” wrote Roddick in a message posted on the company’s Web site. “Why waste a container when you can refill it? And why buy more of something that you can use?”

It was ideas such as these that became the foundation of the company’s environmental activism.

Over the years, Roddick saw the company grow into a cosmetics brand with 2,000-plus retail outlets in more than 50 countries. Last year, L’Oreal acquired the company.

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