BEAUTY CARE

LOOK Beauty’s PediSpa foot masks make way to Target shelves

BY David Salazar

TORONTO — Masks have emerged recently as a growing category within beauty, and Canadian company LOOK Beauty’s masque Bar has been working to bring masks to a larger market while moving beyond the traditional face mask. Among the company’s line of products — which includes 12 different masque Bar face masks —are the PediSpa foot masks, which have recently become available at Target and on the retailer’s site. 
 
The foot masks, which are worn like socks, come in two varieties — Intensive Moisturizing and Exfoliating. The former treats dry, cracked and callous feet in a 20- to 30-minute treatment, and the latter helps control the buildup of calluses in a 60- to 90-minute treatment. 
 
Both foot masks retail for $9.99. 
 
keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
BEAUTY CARE

House passes Microbead-Free Waters Act

BY David Salazar

WASHINGTON — The U.S. House of Representatives on Monday passed the Microbead-Free Waters Act of 2015, aimed at phasing out synthetic plastic microbeads from personal care and OTC products. Now the bill will move to the Senate for consideration. 
 
Following the bill’s passage, Scott Melville, president and CEO of the Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA), praised the work of its sponsors, Reps. Frank Pallone, Jr., D-N.J, and Fred Upton, R-Mich. 
 
“The OTC medicine industry applauds Representatives Pallone and Upton for shepherding legislation that sets forth feasible phase-out dates for plastic microbeads in OTC products, appropriate definitions of key terms, and ensuring uniform enforcement across the nation,” Melville said. 
 
He added that the removal of mircrobeads from products is a priority for the industry. 
 
“Our industry takes concerns about these solid plastic microbeads possibly entering the marine environment very seriously, and we are committed to reformulating cosmetic OTCs – such as acne face washes and toothpastes – to remove plastic microbeads,” he said. “CHPA member companies have already taken steps to voluntarily remove these solid plastic microbeads from their products by ceasing the development of any new products containing synthetic plastic microbeads and working toward formulating replacement products. The timeframe allocated in this bill provides manufacturers adequate time to identify and phase in alternatives.”
keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
BEAUTY CARE

Korean beauty moves into mass

BY DSN STAFF

Snails made big beauty headlines in 2015.

(To view the full Category Review, click here.)

Snail creams, which gained traction in Korea, crawled into the U.S. market this year and websites, such as Peach and Lily, couldn’t keep them in stock. At first, Alicia Yoon, CEO and founder of the online site, which sells Asian beauty items to North America, was reticent to add snail extract creams. But after she took a chance with what she considered the best of the genre, Mizon, she had a sales bonanza on her hands. “And no snails were harmed,” she added.

Yoon is at the forefront of an explosion of interest in Korean beauty, an industry she said she’s not surprised is expanding since Korean women take pride in skin and beauty regimens. Emerging in addition to snail creams are more cushion applicators, hydrating masks, Botox-in-a-bottle products and more stick formulations.

Specialty stores embraced Asian beauty trends early, adding such lines as Dr. Jart+, AmorePacific and TonyMoly.

Asian beauty products are filtering into the mass market, too. Of course, the BB cream invasion a few years ago was a tease of what was to come. Cushion technology is used in the Laneige skin care collection sold at Target. Water formulas are seemingly everywhere after success in Asia, as seen in such mass items as Boots No7 Hydrating Water Spray and, once again, Laneige Water Base CC cream. And at this summer’s National Association of Chain Drug Store’s Total Store Expo, several drug store buyers noted lines with Korean heritage.

In addition to a bevy of masks and water formulas inspired by Asian beauty, retailers also singled out Absolute New York, a color collection from Nicka K.

Alex Chung, director of marketing for Nicka K, said the company takes its cues from Korea, but adapts for the U.S. market. Some styles are too bold for America, he added. Nicka K is sold in Ulta Beauty and CVS, among other stores. The Absolute collection encompasses 300 SKUs and retails for between $4.99 and $12.99.

Retailers anticipate mass skin care extensions inspired by Korean concepts in 2016. But some cutting-edge experts noted they are already onto other countries for inspiration. “There’s so much attention on Korea, but I’m finding my customers interested in what’s selling well in Australia now,” said Jessica Richards, founder and beauty brand adviser for the curated beauty emporium Shen Beauty.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?