News

Little Clinic partners with VCU on four Kroger retail clinics

BY Michael Johnsen

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – The Little Clinic and Virginia Commonwealth University Health on Monday formed a clinical collaboration to provide consumers with improved access to healthcare services with VCU Health’s MCV physicians and specialists supporting The Little Clinic locations inside four Richmond-area Kroger stores.
 
“This collaboration expands healthcare access for VCU Health patients who now have the option of seeking care at The Little Clinic, close to where they live, work and go to school,” stated Ken Patric, chief medical officer for The Little Clinic. “We are excited to leverage our strengths with VCU Health for the betterment of the community at large.”
 
“We are in the midst of redesigning health care and VCU Health is committed to creating a model of care that is sustainable," added Marsha Rappley VP VCU Health Sciences and CEO VCU Health. "By partnering with the Little Clinic, people will get the right care in a place that’s convenient to their home.”
 
 
 
keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
News

A&D Medical adds to its WellnessConnected family of products

BY Michael Johnsen

LAS VEGAS – A&D Medical on Wednesday unveiled a new line of personal mobile health devices as part of the WellnessConnected family – LifeSource UltraConnect – at CES 2016, with the introduction of its LifeSource UltraConnect Wireless upper arm and wrist blood pressure monitors.
 
"The new form factor brings blood pressure monitoring to an enhanced level, allowing the products to support both traditional stand-alone use as well as improved wireless use when coupled with a smartphone," stated Terry Duesterhoeft, president and CEO of A&D Medical. "We designed the new products based on feedback from consumers, who wanted simplified products with easy-to-use wireless capability, while also delivering accurate data points that can be seamlessly shared with healthcare providers."
 
Designed for simplified monitoring and data transfer, that data is transmitted through the user's smartphone to his/her personal WellnessConnected account on A&D's secure cloud, and can then be shared with physicians and other care givers via email, social media or through an A&D partner API.
 
"The new product line leverages our deep experience in designing and delivering connected products to both the consumer wellness and healthcare spaces," Duesterhoeft said.
 
The new LifeSource UltraConnect blood pressure monitors will be available in the summer of 2016.
 
 
 
keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?
News

GUEST BLOG: Creating an effective process for Returns in omnichannel retail

BY Gregory Davis

With the major selling holidays now behind us, retailers are preparing to handle the onslaught of returns that began on Dec. 26 and continue well into the first few weeks of the New Year.
   
In fact, according to the National Retail Federation’s “2014 Consumer Returns in the Retail Industry,” the amount of holiday merchandise returned to stores last year amounted to $68.9 billion.

For omnichannel retailers, the returns process can be a make-it-or-break-it -moment in terms of creating a lasting customer experience memory with their consumers. Because customer loyalty is the product of all engagements with a retail brand, a smooth and customer-centered returns process is a critical part of the omnichannel shopping experience. To fully prepare a retail organization for the heavy traffic of expected returns that will happen both online and in-store, it’s important to take a behind-the-scenes look at the processes that help drive a smooth return.

In the digital world that we now live in, today’s consumers require the ability to purchase items online and return those items at the physical store if needed.

The returns process should be seamless and responsive to all channels while also guaranteeing consumer’s privacy and information safety, diminishing the possibilities of credit card fraud as much as possible.

Retail industry veterans will probably remember how older point of sale (POS) systems would mask credit card information — a setup that was significantly easier for fraudsters to take advantage of and one that led to restrictive return policies that often created ill will with customers. However, with the tokenized approach outlined below, the POS doesn’t hold any credit card data. As a result, retailers can offer more flexible, shopper-friendly return policies without jeopardizing the shopper’s card data.

The Players
With a few additions, the same systems and entities are involved in the returns process as in the payment process:

• The POS system: The POS is responsible for scanning the receipt for the return transaction and the eligible items. It also communicates with the enterprise transaction database and returns management system to verify the return.

The PIN entry device (PED, a.k.a., the PIN pad): As with a purchase, the PED accepts and encrypts the data for the card used in the original transaction.

The enterprise transaction database: This back office retail system maintains a rolling record of recent transactions associated with the token generated during the original purchase.

The returns management system: This system logs all returns activity against the original transaction.

The electronic payment server (EPS): During the returns process, the EPS accepts the encrypted data from the card swipe and communicates with the payment gateway.

The payment gateway: This application typically runs at a central enterprise location. Its role is to interact with the EPS to take the card swipe and generate a numerical token used as a card’s identifier during the return. It can also house a token vault where the token from the original transaction is stored.

The acquiring bank: This is the bank or financial institution that processes the original payment on behalf of the retailer and credits the shopper’s account with a valid return.

The Returns Process
While the return transaction between an associate and a customer can take just two minutes to complete, the process is more complex than just pressing a few buttons.

When a shopper hands an associate the card used for the initial transaction, the associate should proceed to swipe the card through the PED. The PED will then encrypt the card information and forwards it to the EPS. The EPS contacts the payment gateway’s token vault, and the token vault generates a token based on the card information (and matching the token from the original transaction) and sends the token back to the POS.

The POS takes the token and searches the enterprise transaction database for a transaction associated with that same token. The enterprise transaction database returns all matching transaction information to the POS (multiple transactions may match).

The associate selects the item to be returned from the matching transactions and scans the returned item. The POS connects with the returns management system to ensure the item is linked to one of the transactions, and returns management sends a confirmation to the POS.

Following the confirmation, the associate swipes the credit card at the PED, the encrypted information goes to the EPS, the token vault at the payment gateway generates a new token for the return, and the token goes to the acquiring bank to have them apply the credit to the shopper’s account.

The token for the return is also forwarded to the POS to keep a record of the return and to transmit the transaction data to the ERP system.

Understanding the returns process can be a critical step in maximizing the omnichannel customer experience. For retailers, the returns process is more than an afterthought. As more customers buy online and return items to the store, it can be a clear differentiator in the shopping experience.

A safe, secure returns transaction is a small but significant part of building the good will that will drive repeat visits and future purchases.



Gregory Davis is VP of product strategy at Starmount. He can be contacted at gdavis@starmount.com.

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

A.Anson says:
Oct-01-2016 04:47 am

Channels and social websites have a big impact on customer attitude. Technologies and technique to growth successful omnichannel retail in experience. Social media is the best strongest power in online and physical stores. Thanks, Visit here can you write my assignment

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon's entry would shake up the most?