PHARMACY

Lilly helps African-Americans face diabetes with new Web series

BY Allison Cerra

INDIANAPOLIS African-Americans seeking help with their Type 2 diabetes management can look no further than a free webisode series on FACE-Diabetes.com.

Part of Eli Lilly’s Fearless African-Americans Connected and Empowered Diabetes initiative, the F.A.C.E. webisode series provides virtual diabetes-friendly cooking demonstrations, culturally relevant eating and lifestyle tips, and useful advice from a physical fitness expert and certified diabetes educator.

The F.A.C.E. initiative, which was launched in 2008, seeks to foster behavioral and attitudinal changes in areas critical to success in managing diabetes, Lilly said. Visitors to FACE-Diabetes.com will find information about:

  • Nutrition and healthy eating: Highlights diabetes-friendly meal planning and offers healthy takes on traditional soul food and similar family meals;
  • Exercise and staying active: Highlights at-home exercise tips with the help of Mocha Lee, a physical fitness expert, to get people moving in a way that fits their lifestyles;
  • Testimonial from Angie Stone: The singer/songwriter shares her personal story and successful approach to managing her diabetes for the last 10 years; and
  • F.A.C.E. Diabetes events and resources: Helps visitors find local events in their area and highlights other important milestones, such as National Diabetes Month.

 

 

"F.A.C.E. Diabetes is committed to helping African-Americans with Type 2 diabetes access practical disease management solutions and information," said Bertika Quintero, brand director for Lilly diabetes outreach initiatives. "The F.A.C.E. webisode series is just one of the many exciting educational opportunities that address the specific cultural needs of African-Americans with Type 2 diabetes in a new and exciting way. It features topics that are important to them in their daily lives."

 

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Pennsylvania boosts pharmacists’ role; NACDS hails bid for collaboration

BY Jim Frederick

ALEXANDRIA, Va. In a gesture hailed by retail pharmacy advocates, the Keystone State is moving to expand the role its pharmacists play in improving patient health and outcomes.

The move comes with enactment of a Pennsylvania law, H.B. 1041, which will open new opportunities for collaborative medication therapy management between physicians and pharmacists on behalf of patients in a community pharmacy setting. Previously, such team approaches were permitted only in such institutional settings as hospitals and nursing homes in the state. 

The National Association of Chain Drug Stores had high praise for the new law, calling it an “important victory,” and citing the efforts made by the Pennsylvania Association of Chain Drug Stores and the Pennsylvania Pharmacists Association toward its passage. “With the enactment of this legislation, Pennsylvania has said ‘yes’ to improving the health and lives of patients, and to reducing overall healthcare costs,” said NACDS president and CEO Steve Anderson. “This new law recognizes the expertise of pharmacists, the accessibility of community pharmacy and the ability of pharmacists to help patients properly manage their health conditions for the well-being of patients and for the good of society.”

Pennsylvania is the 33rd state to allow collaborative drug therapy management in the community setting, according to NACDS research. “Nine states allow it in institutional settings only, and eight do not allow it at all,” noted the group Friday.

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Taro receives FDA approval for Kytril generic

BY Alaric DeArment

HAWTHORNE, N.Y. Taro Pharmaceutical Industries has received approval from the Food and Drug Administration to market its generic version of a drug used to prevent nausea and vomiting in patients on chemotherapy, the Israeli generic drug maker said Friday.

The FDA approved Taro’s granisetron hydrochloride tablets in the 1-mg strength. The tablets are a generic version of Roche’s Kytril tablets.

Granisetron tablets had sales of around $15 million in 2009, according to unnamed industry sources cited by Taro.

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