HEALTH

Lack of sleep may increase IFG risk, study finds

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK Lack of beauty sleep may up one’s risk of developing a condition that leads to diabetes and heart disease, a new study found.

Researchers from Warwick Medical School and the State University of New York at Buffalo examined six years of data from 1,455 participants in the Western New York Health Study, all of whom were between the ages of 35 and 79 years, and found that people who sleep less than six hours a night may be three times more likely to develop incident-impaired fasting glycaemia. IFG causes the body to be unable to regulate glucose as efficiently as it should.

Lead author at Warwick Medical School Dr. Saverio Stranges said: "We found that short sleep, less than six hours, was associated with a significant, threefold increased likelihood of developing IFG, compared [with] people who got an average of six to eight hours sleep a night. Previous studies have shown that short sleep duration results in a 28% increase in mean levels of the appetite stimulating hormone ghrelin so it can affect feeding behaviors. Other studies have also shown that a lack of sleep can decrease glucose tolerance and increases the production of cortisol, a hormone produced in response to stress."

 

Stranges added that, "more research is needed, but our study does suggest a very strong correlation between lack of sleep and Type 2 diabetes and heart disease."

 

The study was published in the journal Annals of Epidemiology.

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AstraZeneca promotes healthy lifestyles with Crestor

BY Alaric DeArment

WILMINGTON, Del. With September marked as National Cholesterol Education Month, drug maker AstraZeneca is using the occasion to push lifestyles that promote low cholesterol, the Anglo-Swedish company said.

 

AstraZeneca, which markets the cholesterol-lowering drug Crestor (rosuvastatin calcium), is pushing such habits as a healthy diet and exercise as ways to keep cholesterol down. According to the American Heart Association, 102 million Americans ages 20 years and older have borderline-high or high cholesterol.

 

 

“The patient-doctor partnership is one of the most critical relationships you can have, and National Cholesterol Education Month can be a reminder to see your doctor, talk about your cholesterol numbers and target goal, and understand how to assess your cardiovascular risk,” physician and founder of the Texas-based Legacy Heart Center Waenard Miller said in a statement on behalf of AstraZeneca.

 

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Former MinuteClinic exec shifts to Santa Rosa Community Health Centers

BY Antoinette Alexander

SANTA ROSA, Calif. Former MinuteClinic regional medical director Francisco Trilla has joined Santa Rosa Community Health Centers, according to local news reports.

Trilla will serve as the new chief medical officer of Santa Rosa Community Health Centers, overseeing clinical programs at all of its eight facilities with "an emphasis on access and quality," according to reports.

Trilla most recently worked at Beth Israel Deacones Medical Center. He also was chair of the licensing committee for the Massachusetts’ Board of Registration Medicine and was the medical director of Atreva Health Care. In addition, he served as regional medical director of MinuteClinic and an assistant clinical professor at Harvard Medical School.

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